Government Technology

Frank Abagnale on Identity Theft: Technology Breeds Crime



September 26, 2008 By

In a keynote speech given yesterday at the Government Technology Conference East, Frank Abagnale poignantly addressed many of the security issues that government, businesses and the individual are faced with today. Abagnale -- whose life was the subject of the movie "Catch Me if You Can" -- spent the early part of his life living on fake identities and stolen cash. Now, however, Abagnale now lectures on the potential risks involved in everyday transactions. Writing a check, using a debit card, making purchases online or even withdrawing cash from an ATM are all actions that can put the individual at risk. And while the times have changed and technology has advanced, Abagnale claims that much has remained the same in the world of identity theft and fraud.

Because of public access laws and the necessity of open information, gathering basic data on a given person -- living or dead, young or old, rich or poor - -- is, as he puts it, easy as counting to one, two, three. "If you make it easy for people to steal from you, it is unfortunate, but people will," said Abagnale.

Since April of 2007, there have been 15 million victims of identity theft. That's one victim every four seconds. According to Abagnale, identity theft "is a crime limited only by the criminal's imagination." A new type of identity theft has presented itself as recently as 2008. It's called "Synthetic Identity Theft." By using this type of theft, criminals can remain virtually undetected until it is far too late to catch them. The method used is as follows: A criminal obtains an individual's personal data -- name, date of birth, Social Security number, etc. -- and proceeds to open a credit card. But the criminal will purposefully change just one letter of the name or one digit of the Social Security number, knowing the credit bureaus have a "tolerance" feature built into their system which allows for human error when filling out applications. The credit card will be issued in the original individual's name, but under a secondary file. The criminal then has time to open more credit cards, build up credit, apply for a loan, default on the loan, and the individual is left to repair the damages.

Abagnale, citing various examples, said that people who steal personal information are not always hackers who use hi-tech devices and complex methods to break into an individual's computer. More often than not, personal information is right out in the open. Forms that are sent in the mail postcard-style will contain names, birthdates, and Social Security numbers. If not properly shredded, documents found in the garbage can easily be put back together in a few hours. Public records are just that: public. And there are a number of Web sites that will sell Social Security numbers for a very small fee (which is still completely legal, according to Abagnale). With so many ways for criminals to gather information, is it any surprise that identity theft is the fastest growing crime in the world?

"There is virtually no risk involved in identity theft. One in 700 thieves are caught and charged," said Abagnale. "The FBI will not investigate [an identity theft] crime less than $100,000. Most U.S. attorneys will not prosecute crimes under $250,000 and most district attorneys will not prosecute crimes under $5,000. The criminals know that if they stay under the threshold, they're not likely to get prosecuted. So we can't rely on the government to protect us, we can't rely on the bank to protect us, we can't rely on the police to protect us-- we have to be a little smarter, a little wiser."

Abagnale says that one of the best preventative measures against identity theft is education. He has dedicated much


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Comments

John Barksdale    |    Commented September 28, 2008

As a victim of identity theft, I became furious when I learned how poorly banks and credit card issuers verify the identity of credit applicants. I strongly believe that banks and credit card issuers should clean up the mess of identity theft for financial fraud, not the victims. I've posted my personal identity theft story at http://identitythefthurts.com.

John Barksdale    |    Commented September 28, 2008

As a victim of identity theft, I became furious when I learned how poorly banks and credit card issuers verify the identity of credit applicants. I strongly believe that banks and credit card issuers should clean up the mess of identity theft for financial fraud, not the victims. I've posted my personal identity theft story at http://identitythefthurts.com.

John Barksdale    |    Commented September 28, 2008

As a victim of identity theft, I became furious when I learned how poorly banks and credit card issuers verify the identity of credit applicants. I strongly believe that banks and credit card issuers should clean up the mess of identity theft for financial fraud, not the victims. I've posted my personal identity theft story at http://identitythefthurts.com.


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