Government Technology

Bill Would Penalize States That Don't Enact No-Texting-While-Driving Law



August 4, 2009 By

Driver use of text messaging and electronic devices will be the subject of a September summit in Washington, D.C., called by U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood.

Last year, a British study found texting while driving more dangerous than driving drunk, and several recent U.S. rail crashes caused by texting operators -- including 25 deaths in a California train wreck last  September -- has focused attention on use of electronic devices while driving.

"The bottom line is, distracted driving is dangerous driving," said LaHood in a statement. "Following next month's summit, I plan to announce a list of concrete steps we will take to make drivers think twice about taking their eyes off the road for any reason."

"We're pleased to have the support and leadership of Secretary LaHood and the Department of Transportation on this very important issue," said American Trucking Association President and CEO Bill Graves in a release. "Improving driver performance by eliminating distractions, including those caused by text messaging, will greatly improve the safety of all motorists."

ATA supports the "Avoiding Life-Endangering and Reckless Texting by Drivers Act of 2009." The bill would require all states to ban writing, sending or reading text messages using a hand-held mobile telephone or other portable electronic communication device. States that do not comply with the legislation risk losing 25 percent of their annual federal highway funding.


| More

Comments

Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Cybersecurity in an "All-IP World" Are You Prepared?
In a recent survey conducted by Public CIO, over 125 respondents shared how they protect their environments from cyber threats and the challenges they see in an all-IP world. Read how your cybersecurity strategies and attitudes compare with your peers.
Maintain Your IT Budget with Consistent Compliance Practices
Between the demands of meeting federal IT compliance mandates, increasing cybersecurity threats, and ever-shrinking budgets, it’s not uncommon for routine maintenance tasks to slip among state and local government IT departments. If it’s been months, or even only days, since you have maintained your systems, your agency may not be prepared for a compliance audit—and that could have severe financial consequences. Regardless of your mission, consistent systems keep your data secure, your age
Best Practice Guide for Cloud and As-A-Service Procurements
While technology service options for government continue to evolve, procurement processes and policies have remained firmly rooted in practices that are no longer effective. This guide, built upon the collaborative work of state and local government and industry executives, outlines and explains the changes needed for more flexible and agile procurement processes.
View All

Featured Papers