Government Technology

    Digital Communities
    Industry Members

  • Click sponsor logos for whitepapers, case studies, and best practices.
  • McAfee

Caltrans Official Elected Chairman of the Intelligent Transportation Society of America's Board of Directors



June 6, 2008 By

The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) announced today that the department's chief deputy director Randell Iwasaki, one of the nation's leading authorities on intelligent transportation systems (ITS), has been elected by the Intelligent Transportation Society of America as chairman of its board of directors. He is the first official from any state department of transportation to achieve this. Iwasaki has served as vice chair of the board since June 2007.

"Improving transportation infrastructure is more than just building new roads," Iwasaki said. "ITS technologies can assist in saving motorists travel time, decreasing air pollution and improving roadway safety."

Iwasaki has a distinguished record with Caltrans, serving more than 20 years in a number of high profile engineering and management positions. From December 2004 until December 2005, he managed Caltrans' $8.6 billion Toll Bridge Seismic Retrofit Program. He earned a bachelor's degree in engineering from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and a master's in engineering in from California State University, Fresno.

Caltrans has about $2.5 billion in ITS field elements integrated into California's transportation infrastructure. During the current fiscal year, Caltrans will spend $5.7 million on ITS research. In 1996, Caltrans pioneered one of the first automated freeway incident detection systems in the nation, the Caltrans Automated Warning System (CAWS). Over the past two decades, Caltrans and California's universities have partnered on a wide range of ITS projects. Caltrans and the French ministry of transportation signed an agreement to establish a research partnership involving ITS.

The Intelligent Transportation Society of America is the leading advocate for technologies that improve the safety, security and efficiency of the nation's surface transportation system. Members include private corporations, public agencies, and academic institutions.

 


| More

Comments

Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Digital Cities & Counties Survey: Best Practices Quick Reference Guide
This Best Practices Quick Reference Guide is a compilation of examples from the 2013 Digital Cities and Counties Surveys showcasing the innovative ways local governments are using technological tools to respond to the needs of their communities. It is our hope that by calling attention to just a few examples from cities and counties of all sizes, we will encourage further collaboration and spark additional creativity in local government service delivery.
Wireless Reporting Takes Pain (& Wait) out of Voting
In Michigan and Minnesota counties, wireless voting via the AT&T network has brought speed, efficiency and accuracy to elections - another illustration of how mobility and machine-to-machine (M2M) technology help governments to bring superior services and communication to constituents.
Why Would a City Proclaim Their Data “Open by Default?”
The City of Palo Alto, California, a 2013 Center for Digital Government Digital City Survey winner, has officially proclaimed “open” to be the default setting for all city data. Are they courageous or crazy?
View All