Government Technology

    Digital Communities
    Industry Members

  • Click sponsor logos for whitepapers, case studies, and best practices.
  • McAfee

DHS Releases REAL ID Grant Guidance



December 14, 2007 By

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released today grant guidance and application kits for two grant programs totaling more than $35 million to assist states in preparing for REAL ID implementation. REAL ID addresses a core 9/11 Commission finding to enhance the security, integrity and protection of licensing and identification systems nationwide, and was mandated by Congress.

"The 9/11 Commission stated unambiguously that for terrorists, travel documents are as important as weapons," said Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff. "Too often bogus birth certificates and other documents have been used to unlawfully obtain a driver's license, causing the American public to insist on greater identity protection. These funds will advance the ability of states to verify the legitimacy of documents that applicants present, and to confirm that the applicants are who they say they are."

The REAL ID Demonstration Grant Program will provide $31.3 million for checking motor vehicle records in other states to ensure that drivers do not hold multiple licenses, and for verification against federal records like immigration status. This grant will help standardize methods by which states may seamlessly verify an applicant's information with another state and deploy data and document verification capabilities that can be used by all states, while protecting personal identification information.

The REAL ID Vital Events Verification State Project Grant will provide $4 million to help verify birth certificates and other vital records. This funding complements a $3 million grant for a REAL ID Pilot Project awarded to Kentucky in fiscal year 2006 that tested unique software to improve identity verification capabilities. The additional $4 million will further support and expand the pilot program, allowing other states to acquire and benefit from this or similar software that verifies birth record information for individuals applying for a REAL ID driver's license or ID card.

States competing for the REAL ID Demonstration Grant are encouraged to submit proposals that demonstrate how other states would be able to use, modify, or transfer a personal identification verification system or established architecture that is designed and developed through federal funding.

DHS began allowing states to use up to 20 percent of the State Homeland Security Grant Program (SHSGP) for REAL ID initiatives in fiscal year 2007. More than $509 million in SHSGP funding awards were provided last year.

For more information and the complete application kit, please visit www.grants.gov.


| More

Comments

Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Digital Cities & Counties Survey: Best Practices Quick Reference Guide
This Best Practices Quick Reference Guide is a compilation of examples from the 2013 Digital Cities and Counties Surveys showcasing the innovative ways local governments are using technological tools to respond to the needs of their communities. It is our hope that by calling attention to just a few examples from cities and counties of all sizes, we will encourage further collaboration and spark additional creativity in local government service delivery.
Wireless Reporting Takes Pain (& Wait) out of Voting
In Michigan and Minnesota counties, wireless voting via the AT&T network has brought speed, efficiency and accuracy to elections - another illustration of how mobility and machine-to-machine (M2M) technology help governments to bring superior services and communication to constituents.
Why Would a City Proclaim Their Data “Open by Default?”
The City of Palo Alto, California, a 2013 Center for Digital Government Digital City Survey winner, has officially proclaimed “open” to be the default setting for all city data. Are they courageous or crazy?
View All