Government Technology

E-Vote: Colorado to Begin Recertification of Voting Machines



February 12, 2008 By

Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter yesterday signed bipartisan legislation that will allow Secretary of State Mike Coffman to begin the review and recertification process for electronic voting machines that the secretary decertified in December.

House Bill 08-1155's chief sponsors were Rep. David Balmer, R-Centennial, and Sen. Ken Gordon, D-Denver.

"Access to electronic voting machines is required by federal law and is essential for those in the disabled community who wish to vote without the assistance of another person," Gov. Ritter said. "Many of the machines were decertified due to problems that can be addressed by simply upgrading software or hardware or making other changes to how the machines are used.

"Current law prevents the secretary from taking these changes into account without going through a lengthy process that will not give our county clerks adequate time to prepare for the 2008 elections," Ritter added. "House Bill 1155 will allow the secretary to move forward quickly without compromising the accuracy and security of our voting equipment. This will allow for necessary, limited use of electronic voting machines this year.

"We are still moving ahead with legislation for statewide paper-ballot elections. Paper ballots in precincts are a tried-and-true approach that will enable county clerks to plan for the elections in an environment that minimizes the risk of litigation and maximizes the likelihood of success."

Said Rep. Balmer: "This bill will give Secretary Coffman the ability to take certain decertified machines back through the process as quickly as possible without reducing the stringent requirements we have in Colorado."

Said Sen. Gordon: "We are doing this in a bipartisan way. We want the people of Colorado to have confidence that they will be able to vote, and that their votes will count. We will have a good election process that the people of Colorado can be proud of."


| More

Comments

American Voter    |    Commented February 12, 2008

The statement "Access to electronic voting machines is required by federal law" is false. HAVA does not require electronics. There are ways for disabled voters to create ballots without the use of the electronics, which are known to lose, fake, and switch votes, are overpriced, unreliable, and vulnerable to undetectable tampering. The GAO found them unsuitable for use in elections.

American Voter    |    Commented February 12, 2008

The statement "Access to electronic voting machines is required by federal law" is false. HAVA does not require electronics. There are ways for disabled voters to create ballots without the use of the electronics, which are known to lose, fake, and switch votes, are overpriced, unreliable, and vulnerable to undetectable tampering. The GAO found them unsuitable for use in elections.

American Voter    |    Commented February 12, 2008

The statement "Access to electronic voting machines is required by federal law" is false. HAVA does not require electronics. There are ways for disabled voters to create ballots without the use of the electronics, which are known to lose, fake, and switch votes, are overpriced, unreliable, and vulnerable to undetectable tampering. The GAO found them unsuitable for use in elections.

ERK    |    Commented February 13, 2008

ADA compliance has long ago been used as a pathetic excuse to keep systems that simply can't be trusted. Also, mere software patches or upgrades will not make these machines reliable. The entire operating system needs to be replaced. Finally, software upgrades do not address the major hardware problems discovered with these class of machines.

ERK    |    Commented February 13, 2008

ADA compliance has long ago been used as a pathetic excuse to keep systems that simply can't be trusted. Also, mere software patches or upgrades will not make these machines reliable. The entire operating system needs to be replaced. Finally, software upgrades do not address the major hardware problems discovered with these class of machines.

ERK    |    Commented February 13, 2008

ADA compliance has long ago been used as a pathetic excuse to keep systems that simply can't be trusted. Also, mere software patches or upgrades will not make these machines reliable. The entire operating system needs to be replaced. Finally, software upgrades do not address the major hardware problems discovered with these class of machines.


Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
McAfee Enterprise Security Manager and Threat Intelligence Exchange
As a part of the Intel® Security product offering, McAfee® Enterprise Security Manager and McAfee Threat Intelligence Exchange work together to provide organizations with exactly what they need to fight advanced threats. You get the situational awareness, actionable intelligence, and instantaneous speed to immediately identify, respond to, and proactively neutralize threats in just milliseconds.
Better security. Better government.
Powering security at all levels of government with simpler, more connected IT.
Cybersecurity in an "All-IP World" Are You Prepared?
In a recent survey conducted by Public CIO, over 125 respondents shared how they protect their environments from cyber threats and the challenges they see in an all-IP world. Read how your cybersecurity strategies and attitudes compare with your peers.
View All

Featured Papers