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E-Vote: Connecticut Recounts Validate Optical-Scan Results Says Bysiewicz



September 21, 2007 By

Connecticut Secretary of the State Susan Bysiewicz just announced that recount results from tight races in the September 11th primaries in New Haven and Hamden show that new optical-scan technology in those communities performed accurately.

Recounts were performed in New Haven for the Ward 30 Aldermanic primary and in Hamden for Council primaries in Districts 2 and 8. In all three cases, the results of the recounts perfectly matched the results from election night, according to a release from Bysiewicz's office.

"The initial recount results confirm that the optical-scan machines performed well and that every vote was recorded accurately," said Bysiewicz. "My office will continue to receive recount results and make those results public. In addition, next week we will begin our process of auditing election results in 11 polling places across the state. Together, these post-election procedures should send a strong and simple message to voters -- your vote will be counted, we'll make sure of it."

Recounts are required by state law for any race in which the margin of victory is 20 votes or one half of one percent. The margin of victory for the New Haven Ward 30 Aldermanic race was 14 votes (145 to 131). The margin of victory in the Hamden races was 8 votes in District 2 (115 to  107) and 7 votes in District 8 (219 to 212).


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