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EU Adopts Missing Children Hotline Number



February 19, 2007 By

Last Thursday, the European Commission announced the adoption of the 116000 telephone number as a missing children hotline for all member states. Other common Europe-wide telephone services of social value starting with 116 may soon be reserved following the decision.

"I am delighted that today the first major step towards a single EU hotline number for missing children has been taken," said EU Telecom Commissioner Viviane Reding. "I urge member states to act now to make this a reality, so that Europe's parents will soon know that they are able to call this number and get immediate help."

The first number to be reserved Europe-wide is 116000. All other numbers beginning with 116 are also reserved for social services in Europe and this decision is binding on member states. These free phone numbers and the services they provide will benefit citizens by helping those in difficulty, said the Commission, or by contributing to their well-being or safety.

A public consultation will be launched in March to identify social services that may benefit from 116 numbers which may then also be reserved.


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