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Executive Office for United States Attorneys Selects Software


May 25, 2004 By

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Executive Office for United States Attorneys (EOUSA) wanted to provide policy-based client security for 15,000-plus mobile and desktop computer users. The EOUSA is an organization within the Department of Justice (DoJ) that provides the United States Attorneys with general executive assistance and direction, policy development, administrative management direction and oversight, operational support, coordination with other components of the DoJ and other federal agencies.

The EOUSA's responsibilities include certain legal, budgetary, administrative, personnel services, as well as legal education. The EOUSA provides IT support for over 15,000 end-users in over 200 locations across the United States, and makes broad use of secure computer technology to carry out its mission.

The EOUSA chose Senforce Technologies' Enterprise Mobile Security Manager (EMSM) version 2.5 for its security capabilities, including next-generation, kernel-layer stateful firewall technology, and enterprisewide distribution, control and management of end user security policies. With the software, mobile and desktop security settings are centralized under IT management and control, complying with EOUSA endpoint security objectives. In deployment to its users, the EOUSA will utilize Senforce EMSM on both mobile and stationary PC endpoints.

The security software enables IT managers to easily create, deploy, monitor and enforce computer security policies to protect corporate data assets stored on mobile computing devices such as notebook and tablet computers. Software components enable IT professionals to centrally manage and enforce client computer security with:

?Automatic recognition of mobile endpoint location and policy enforcement as endpoints move from location to location

?Next generation, stateful firewall protection operating at the NDIS intermediate driver layer

?Wireless connectivity control for notebook PCs with both after-market and embedded WLAN adapters to manage Wi-Fi network adapter communications (up to and including completely silencing WLAN radios when necessary)

?Management of which wireless network access points users can see and use

?File storage device control to manage and prevent access to local file storage devices such as USB thumb drives, etc.

?Network-utilizing application control to enable/disable bandwidth by application

?Host integrity and remediation features that check for current anti-virus signatures, and enforce updates to those signatures when they are out of date before allowing connectivity

?Reporting features for tracking user compliance with endpoint security policies

The company preserves the productivity benefits of mobile connectivity without compromising sensitive data residing on the mobile professional's computer.


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