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GISCI Announces Mentoring Program for Students, Non-Traditional Students, and Young Professionals



January 7, 2008 By

The GIS Certification Institute (GISCI) has created a mentoring program to link students and young professionals up with certified GIS professionals (GISPs). The program is the first of its kind linking certified GIS professionals up with future practitioners, according to a GISCI release.

GISCI continues its mission of promoting the GIS profession as a viable career path for aspiring geospatial technology professionals.

Students and young professionals enter the GIS field with questions. These can range from "what skills are necessary to become a GIS professional" to "what will my typical work week be like" to "how should I prepare for an interview or internship." GISPs have the answers.

The mentored individual must be a student (undergraduate or above), non-traditional student (student attending school later in life) or young professional (1-2 years in the field). The mentoring relationship is meant to last for a minimum of six months. After that, the GISP will be eligible for one contribution point towards his or her recertification. The mentored will be better equipped to confront the challenges of the workplace. Additionally, both the student and mentor will have made a professional contact that can be relied upon for years to come.

Ideally, both the mentor and mentee will reside in the same geographic area but this is not a requirement. The information that GISPs will be able to offer, be it technical, ethical or professional will be invaluable to aspiring professionals as they move forward in their careers.

Students or young professionals interested in the program should visit the GISCI Web site for further details on selecting a mentor. The program is open to all current GISPs. Incoming GISPs are eligible to participate only after certification has been granted.


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