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Harris County CIO Steve Jennings Retiring



Steve Jennings, CIO, Harris County, Texas/Photo by Kelly LaDuke
Steve Jennings, CIO, Harris County, Texas

August 20, 2009 By

Photo: Harris County CIO Steve Jennings. Photo by Kelly LaDuke

Steve Jennings, CIO of Harris County, Texas, will retire after 34 years and several landmark projects. He will depart having recently transitioned the county's public safety communications system to cloud computing -- a type of flexible, virtual server capacity existing on the Web.

His last day will be Aug. 31.

Jennings didn't specify his future plans, but said he wanted to stay connected to local government IT in some way.

"Being able to use technical abilities to help your citizens see results -- somehow I'll be involved with that the rest of my life," Jennings said, later adding, "You never totally retire because someone will always call you and say, 'What do you think about this?'"


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Comments

Carolyn Purcell    |    Commented August 21, 2009

Steve has had a remarkable influence on our industry and been a very positive force for government. Congratulations, Steve - and welcome to Austin!

Carolyn Purcell    |    Commented August 21, 2009

Steve has had a remarkable influence on our industry and been a very positive force for government. Congratulations, Steve - and welcome to Austin!

Carolyn Purcell    |    Commented August 21, 2009

Steve has had a remarkable influence on our industry and been a very positive force for government. Congratulations, Steve - and welcome to Austin!

Carolyn Purcell    |    Commented August 21, 2009

Steve has had a remarkable influence on our industry and been a very positive force for government. Congratulations, Steve - and welcome to Austin!

Norma Beissner & Anthony Beissner    |    Commented August 21, 2012

Yeah Steve! Anthony and I love Austin and the beautiful hill country area. Look us up when you and Susan get settled or visiting. We are so very happy for you.


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