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Kentucky Transportation Cabinet Participates in Information Exchange with Russia



July 26, 2005 By

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet is bridging the information and technology divide between the State and Russia. Two top transportation officials are in Perm, Russia this week attending a partnership program and technology information exchange with the Russian Association of Regional Highway Administrations (RADOR).

State Highway Engineer Sam Beverage and Katrina Bradley, chief district engineer, District 9-Flemingsburg, are representing the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) at the exchange. During their visit, Beverage and Bradley will make several presentations, including demonstration of technology, examination of roadways and bridges. In addition, the two will meet with Russian Government officials.

Initiated by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) in 1999, the program assists the Russian delegation in achieving a better understanding of the function, implementation and maintenance of modern transportation systems. To achieve that goal, both Kentuckians and Russians travel to their counterparts' countries as part of the program.

The program lasts through the end of July and is entirely funded by the Federal Highway Administration.


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