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New Jersey Delays Voting Machine Paper-Record Requirement



March 9, 2009 By

New Jersey Gov. Governor Jon S. Corzine (pictured) signed the delay legislation last Friday

New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine, citing the state's "critical economic situation and lack of appropriate technology" signed a bill into law Friday that delays a Jan 1 requirement that voting machines produce individual permanent paper records. The state has been wrestling with the question of voting machine reliability for some time.

According to media reports, the requirement if enacted, would cost around $20 million to fit 10,000 voting machines with printers. The bill just signed into law delays implementation "until the federal government supplies the necessary funds."

New Jersey Assemblywoman Joan M. Quigley sponsored the delay legislation which includes a pilot program to test the printing system.


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Comments

Valerie Lane    |    Commented March 9, 2009

I was born and raised in NJ and I care about your votes. Please learn the truth about e-voting systems, both touchscreen and op/scan paper ballot tabulation machines. In 2007 the CA Top- to-Bottom- Review of voting systems resulted in all machines made by three vendors being decertified for systemic technical system security vulnerabilities.While the Secretary of state conditionally re-approved the faulty systems if mitigating security measures were employed, we now have proof (Humboldt County Nov 2008 election) that these measures are inadequate to protect the integrity of the vote. Read the TTB R reports on SoS Debra Bowen's website. Elections>Voting>Oversight Top-to-Bottom Review. These machines were all federally certified! Don't be fooled. Insist on a completely observable vote count.

Valerie Lane    |    Commented March 9, 2009

I was born and raised in NJ and I care about your votes. Please learn the truth about e-voting systems, both touchscreen and op/scan paper ballot tabulation machines. In 2007 the CA Top- to-Bottom- Review of voting systems resulted in all machines made by three vendors being decertified for systemic technical system security vulnerabilities.While the Secretary of state conditionally re-approved the faulty systems if mitigating security measures were employed, we now have proof (Humboldt County Nov 2008 election) that these measures are inadequate to protect the integrity of the vote. Read the TTB R reports on SoS Debra Bowen's website. Elections>Voting>Oversight Top-to-Bottom Review. These machines were all federally certified! Don't be fooled. Insist on a completely observable vote count.

Valerie Lane    |    Commented March 9, 2009

I was born and raised in NJ and I care about your votes. Please learn the truth about e-voting systems, both touchscreen and op/scan paper ballot tabulation machines. In 2007 the CA Top- to-Bottom- Review of voting systems resulted in all machines made by three vendors being decertified for systemic technical system security vulnerabilities.While the Secretary of state conditionally re-approved the faulty systems if mitigating security measures were employed, we now have proof (Humboldt County Nov 2008 election) that these measures are inadequate to protect the integrity of the vote. Read the TTB R reports on SoS Debra Bowen's website. Elections>Voting>Oversight Top-to-Bottom Review. These machines were all federally certified! Don't be fooled. Insist on a completely observable vote count.


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