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New York City's Congestion Pricing Plan Killed



January 31, 2008 By

New York City Mayor Bloomberg's proposed congestion pricing plan -- under which an $8 charge would be levied on motorists driving into lower Manhattan -- died last night, as the state Senate and Assembly failed to act before a federal traffic relief grant application period expired.

Bloomberg, in his Jan. 17 State of the City address, outlined his congestion pricing traffic control measure among a number of technology-based initiatives. Congestion pricing levies a fee -- or adds a tax according to critics -- on vehicle traffic in congested areas, and has been tried in cities such as London, Stockholm and Singapore.


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Comments

Anonymous    |    Commented February 1, 2008

Get your facts straight!!!! Totally wrong the plan was presented and is publicly available.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 1, 2008

Get your facts straight!!!! Totally wrong the plan was presented and is publicly available.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 1, 2008

Get your facts straight!!!! Totally wrong the plan was presented and is publicly available.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 4, 2008

The state has until March 31 to act, after action by NYC city council. The Congestion Commission (which included members of state agencies) recommended a modified approach, which the city is apparently going along with. So it is very much alive, not dead.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 4, 2008

The state has until March 31 to act, after action by NYC city council. The Congestion Commission (which included members of state agencies) recommended a modified approach, which the city is apparently going along with. So it is very much alive, not dead.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 4, 2008

The state has until March 31 to act, after action by NYC city council. The Congestion Commission (which included members of state agencies) recommended a modified approach, which the city is apparently going along with. So it is very much alive, not dead.

Ben    |    Commented February 12, 2008

Apparently, this publication doesn't believe in retracting information/stories that are incorrect. Just go to the NY times to see that congestion pricing is not dead.

Ben    |    Commented February 12, 2008

Apparently, this publication doesn't believe in retracting information/stories that are incorrect. Just go to the NY times to see that congestion pricing is not dead.

Ben    |    Commented February 12, 2008

Apparently, this publication doesn't believe in retracting information/stories that are incorrect. Just go to the NY times to see that congestion pricing is not dead.


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