Government Technology

New York City's Congestion Pricing Plan Killed



January 31, 2008 By

New York City Mayor Bloomberg's proposed congestion pricing plan -- under which an $8 charge would be levied on motorists driving into lower Manhattan -- died last night, as the state Senate and Assembly failed to act before a federal traffic relief grant application period expired.

Bloomberg, in his Jan. 17 State of the City address, outlined his congestion pricing traffic control measure among a number of technology-based initiatives. Congestion pricing levies a fee -- or adds a tax according to critics -- on vehicle traffic in congested areas, and has been tried in cities such as London, Stockholm and Singapore.


| More

Comments

Anonymous    |    Commented February 1, 2008

Get your facts straight!!!! Totally wrong the plan was presented and is publicly available.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 1, 2008

Get your facts straight!!!! Totally wrong the plan was presented and is publicly available.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 1, 2008

Get your facts straight!!!! Totally wrong the plan was presented and is publicly available.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 4, 2008

The state has until March 31 to act, after action by NYC city council. The Congestion Commission (which included members of state agencies) recommended a modified approach, which the city is apparently going along with. So it is very much alive, not dead.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 4, 2008

The state has until March 31 to act, after action by NYC city council. The Congestion Commission (which included members of state agencies) recommended a modified approach, which the city is apparently going along with. So it is very much alive, not dead.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 4, 2008

The state has until March 31 to act, after action by NYC city council. The Congestion Commission (which included members of state agencies) recommended a modified approach, which the city is apparently going along with. So it is very much alive, not dead.

Ben    |    Commented February 12, 2008

Apparently, this publication doesn't believe in retracting information/stories that are incorrect. Just go to the NY times to see that congestion pricing is not dead.

Ben    |    Commented February 12, 2008

Apparently, this publication doesn't believe in retracting information/stories that are incorrect. Just go to the NY times to see that congestion pricing is not dead.

Ben    |    Commented February 12, 2008

Apparently, this publication doesn't believe in retracting information/stories that are incorrect. Just go to the NY times to see that congestion pricing is not dead.


Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Reduce Talk Time in Your Support Center by 40%
As the amount of information available to citizens and employees grows each year, so do customer expectations for efficient service. Contextual Knowledge makes information easy to find, dropping resolution times and skyrocketing satisfaction.
Emerging Technology Adoption in Local Government
In a recent survey conducted by Government Technology, 125 local government leaders shared their challenges, benefits and priorities when adopting emerging technologies such as cloud, mobility and IP. Read how your jurisdiction’s adoption of technology compares to your peers.
Reducing Conflict Among Officials During a Crisis
Conflict among elected and career officials during a crisis can breed distrust to the point where the overall response effort suffers. This is particularly true when the issue is information sharing in a crisis. This paper explores the conflict that can arise among career and
View All

Featured Papers