Government Technology

New York City's Congestion Pricing Plan Killed



January 31, 2008 By

New York City Mayor Bloomberg's proposed congestion pricing plan -- under which an $8 charge would be levied on motorists driving into lower Manhattan -- died last night, as the state Senate and Assembly failed to act before a federal traffic relief grant application period expired.

Bloomberg, in his Jan. 17 State of the City address, outlined his congestion pricing traffic control measure among a number of technology-based initiatives. Congestion pricing levies a fee -- or adds a tax according to critics -- on vehicle traffic in congested areas, and has been tried in cities such as London, Stockholm and Singapore.


| More

Comments

Anonymous    |    Commented February 1, 2008

Get your facts straight!!!! Totally wrong the plan was presented and is publicly available.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 1, 2008

Get your facts straight!!!! Totally wrong the plan was presented and is publicly available.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 1, 2008

Get your facts straight!!!! Totally wrong the plan was presented and is publicly available.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 4, 2008

The state has until March 31 to act, after action by NYC city council. The Congestion Commission (which included members of state agencies) recommended a modified approach, which the city is apparently going along with. So it is very much alive, not dead.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 4, 2008

The state has until March 31 to act, after action by NYC city council. The Congestion Commission (which included members of state agencies) recommended a modified approach, which the city is apparently going along with. So it is very much alive, not dead.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 4, 2008

The state has until March 31 to act, after action by NYC city council. The Congestion Commission (which included members of state agencies) recommended a modified approach, which the city is apparently going along with. So it is very much alive, not dead.

Ben    |    Commented February 12, 2008

Apparently, this publication doesn't believe in retracting information/stories that are incorrect. Just go to the NY times to see that congestion pricing is not dead.

Ben    |    Commented February 12, 2008

Apparently, this publication doesn't believe in retracting information/stories that are incorrect. Just go to the NY times to see that congestion pricing is not dead.

Ben    |    Commented February 12, 2008

Apparently, this publication doesn't believe in retracting information/stories that are incorrect. Just go to the NY times to see that congestion pricing is not dead.


Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Cybersecurity in an "All-IP World" Are You Prepared?
In a recent survey conducted by Public CIO, over 125 respondents shared how they protect their environments from cyber threats and the challenges they see in an all-IP world. Read how your cybersecurity strategies and attitudes compare with your peers.
Maintain Your IT Budget with Consistent Compliance Practices
Between the demands of meeting federal IT compliance mandates, increasing cybersecurity threats, and ever-shrinking budgets, it’s not uncommon for routine maintenance tasks to slip among state and local government IT departments. If it’s been months, or even only days, since you have maintained your systems, your agency may not be prepared for a compliance audit—and that could have severe financial consequences. Regardless of your mission, consistent systems keep your data secure, your age
Best Practice Guide for Cloud and As-A-Service Procurements
While technology service options for government continue to evolve, procurement processes and policies have remained firmly rooted in practices that are no longer effective. This guide, built upon the collaborative work of state and local government and industry executives, outlines and explains the changes needed for more flexible and agile procurement processes.
View All

Featured Papers