Government Technology

    Digital Communities
    Industry Members

  • Click sponsor logos for whitepapers, case studies, and best practices.
  • McAfee

RIM Previews BlackBerry Client for IBM Lotus Connections



January 25, 2008 By

At Lotusphere 2008, Research In Motion (RIM) previewed its BlackBerry Client for IBM Lotus Connections -- a new software application that runs natively on BlackBerry smartphones to provide mobile users with access to Lotus Connections social software for business. The BlackBerry client application leverages the push-based architecture, security and administration features of BlackBerry Enterprise Server, which provides IT groups with the necessary controls for enabling mobile access to Lotus Connections in the enterprise.

Users can enjoy many of the same benefits and functionality found on the desktop version of Lotus Connections directly from their BlackBerry smartphone, including the ability to collaborate on projects with teammates, locate internal subject matter experts by name or topic, as well as effortlessly share information and research to improve decision making.

"Organizations are embracing social networking tools to improve productivity and enable workers to find the experts and information within their organizations that can help them get their jobs done more effectively," said Mike Lazaridis, president and co-CEO at RIM. "Lotus Connections, which facilitates the gathering and exchange of information through professional networks, is a natural fit with the BlackBerry platform. We are very pleased to introduce the first mobile software application to leverage this exciting new social software for business."

"The challenges of globalization are forcing companies to become more nimble, using an increasingly geographically-dispersed and virtual workforce to remain competitive," said Jeff Schick, vice president of social software, IBM Lotus. "Together with RIM we are excited to be delivering the industry's business-ready social software on the BlackBerry platform."



| More

Comments

Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Digital Cities & Counties Survey: Best Practices Quick Reference Guide
This Best Practices Quick Reference Guide is a compilation of examples from the 2013 Digital Cities and Counties Surveys showcasing the innovative ways local governments are using technological tools to respond to the needs of their communities. It is our hope that by calling attention to just a few examples from cities and counties of all sizes, we will encourage further collaboration and spark additional creativity in local government service delivery.
Wireless Reporting Takes Pain (& Wait) out of Voting
In Michigan and Minnesota counties, wireless voting via the AT&T network has brought speed, efficiency and accuracy to elections - another illustration of how mobility and machine-to-machine (M2M) technology help governments to bring superior services and communication to constituents.
Why Would a City Proclaim Their Data “Open by Default?”
The City of Palo Alto, California, a 2013 Center for Digital Government Digital City Survey winner, has officially proclaimed “open” to be the default setting for all city data. Are they courageous or crazy?
View All