Government Technology

    Digital Communities
    Industry Members

  • Click sponsor logos for whitepapers, case studies, and best practices.
  • McAfee

Recovery.gov to Redesign, Upgrade Transparency



July 9, 2009 By

The U.S. General Services Administration today announced a $9.5 million contract award to Smartronix Inc. for the redesign of the Recovery.gov Web site.

"Recovery.gov 2.0 will use innovative and interactive technologies to help taxpayers see where their dollars are being spent," said James A. Williams, commissioner of GSA's Federal Acquisition Service.  "Armed with easy access to this information, taxpayers can make government more accountable for its decisions." 

In April, federal CIO Vivek Kundra asked the public to participate in an online forum that solicited ideas for improving the Web site.

Recovery.gov was launched in February to track expenditures from the nation's $787 billion economic stimulus package, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. But some lawmakers said they were unsatisfied with the design of Recovery.gov and the information it presented.

In June, the federal government submitted a request for information for redesigning Recovery.gov. The Recovery Board in charge of the Web site wants the redesign to be finished by mid-October. The deadline for states to report Recovery Act spending to the federal Office of Management and Budget is Oct. 10. That reporting data eventually will be integrated in Recovery.gov.


| More

Comments

Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Digital Cities & Counties Survey: Best Practices Quick Reference Guide
This Best Practices Quick Reference Guide is a compilation of examples from the 2013 Digital Cities and Counties Surveys showcasing the innovative ways local governments are using technological tools to respond to the needs of their communities. It is our hope that by calling attention to just a few examples from cities and counties of all sizes, we will encourage further collaboration and spark additional creativity in local government service delivery.
Wireless Reporting Takes Pain (& Wait) out of Voting
In Michigan and Minnesota counties, wireless voting via the AT&T network has brought speed, efficiency and accuracy to elections - another illustration of how mobility and machine-to-machine (M2M) technology help governments to bring superior services and communication to constituents.
Why Would a City Proclaim Their Data “Open by Default?”
The City of Palo Alto, California, a 2013 Center for Digital Government Digital City Survey winner, has officially proclaimed “open” to be the default setting for all city data. Are they courageous or crazy?
View All