Government Technology

Report Released on Public-Sector Blogging and Web 2.0



June 26, 2007 By

Photo: Sweden's embassy in the virtual world of Second Life

The IBM Center for The Business of Government today announced a new report that examines the uses and benefits of social networks and blogging within the public sector.

The Blogging Revolution: Government in the Age of Web 2.0
details the growing acceptance of blogs as a tool for promoting both online and offline engagement of citizens and public agents.

The report, published by IBM and authored by Dr. David C. Wyld, Maurin Professor of Management and director of the Strategic e-Commerce/e-Government Initiative at Southeastern Louisiana University, details blogging activities by members of Congress, governors, city mayors, and police and fire departments, and provides insights on how blogging is used within agencies to improve internal communications and speed the flow of information.

While the use of blogging by political candidates has been highly publicized, less commonly known is the use of this communications medium inside government. According to the report, blogging has moved from the purview of teens and college students to mainstream businesses and government.

Web 2.0
Web 2.0 is characterized by the rise of user-generated content on the Internet, where users no longer need to know anything about computer programming. Dr. Wyld's report is a snapshot of the early stages of Web 2.0, of which blogging is but one of the most publicized technologies used to create social networks. He also points to other Web 2.0 technologies, such as the creation of wikis -- where thousands of users can jointly collaborate in creating something such as the online encyclopedia, Wikipedia. Another fast-growing Web 2.0 phenomenon is 3-D immersive experiences, such as Second Life, where users assume a "virtual identity" and have a personal avatar -- an animated character -- that can shop, play, and learn online. About 100 universities use Second Life to conduct online seminars. Companies use it to conduct employee meetings. Government may someday use it to deliver services to constituents.


| More

Comments

Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
McAfee Enterprise Security Manager and Threat Intelligence Exchange
As a part of the Intel® Security product offering, McAfee® Enterprise Security Manager and McAfee Threat Intelligence Exchange work together to provide organizations with exactly what they need to fight advanced threats. You get the situational awareness, actionable intelligence, and instantaneous speed to immediately identify, respond to, and proactively neutralize threats in just milliseconds.
Better security. Better government.
Powering security at all levels of government with simpler, more connected IT.
Cybersecurity in an "All-IP World" Are You Prepared?
In a recent survey conducted by Public CIO, over 125 respondents shared how they protect their environments from cyber threats and the challenges they see in an all-IP world. Read how your cybersecurity strategies and attitudes compare with your peers.
View All

Featured Papers