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San Francisco Names New CIO



April 30, 2013 By

After an “extensive national search,” Marc Touitou has been named the new San Francisco Chief Information Officer and Director of the Department of Technology by Mayor Ed Lee in an announcement on Thursday. Touitou replaces Jon Walton, San Francisco’s CIO who left in January to become San Mateo County’s CIO.

“Touitou . . . is an accomplished change maker, who has proven executive experience in global organizations and shares my commitment to challenge our own City government to be more accountable and engaged, and make San Francisco, the world’s first City 2.0,” said Mayor Lee, in the press release announcing Touitou’s appointment.

As the CIO, Touitou will advise the Mayor, Board of Supervisors and city departments regarding opportunities to provide higher quality, more timely and more cost-effective governmental services; develop uniform policies and coordinated systems for the use, acquisition and implementation of the ICT technologies; and establish citywide standards and procedures to ensure cost-effective and useful retrieval and exchange of information both within and among the various city departments and between the city to residents and businesses.

The CIO position reports to the Mayor with functional reporting to the City Administrator. The CIO supervises the approximately 200 employees of the Department of Technology and an annual operating budget of $75 million.  Citywide expenditures are approximately $250 million dollars per year. The Department of Technology delivers four core services: Operation and Infrastructure Services and Support, Policy and Planning Services, Customer Support Services and Media Services for the 28,000 City employees and 805,235 residents.

The Mayor touted Touitou’s 30 years of extensive experience in Information Technology, including serving as Senior VP and CIO from 2002-2011 of ASML, a Netherlands semiconductor company. There Touitou lowered the cost of IT from 3.8 percent to 1.7 percent, modernized the company infrastructure, launched the product life cycle management program, and modernized the manufacturing execution system and the engineering division tooling platform and processors. He oversaw about 500 core technologists and consultants. From 1986-1999, he worked for Rohm and Haas, a specialty chemical company in Paris. He held positions of increasing responsibilities leading to his transfer to Philadelphia in 1993. He became the company’s Global Technology Director and later accepted the coatings business CIO position which he held until the end of 2002.


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