Government Technology

Site Reveals Salaries of New York State Employees, Other State Financial Data



August 3, 2008 By

Updated on Jan 15, 2013

Online disclosures of public-sector salaries have increased substantially in the last five years, and not all public employees are pleased. Government Technology articles like the one below -- published in 2008 -- covered posting of salaries for New York state and California state employees. Both sites have since expanded to include pensions, expenditures, payroll, contracts, university salaries and more.

A 2012 Governing review of state government websites found about half now maintain searchable compensation databases. Newspapers and other groups have also contributed, launching their own public employee pay websites, and about 57 percent of survey respondents reported their salary information was posted online, according to Governing. And while some public employees seem resigned to having salaries freely available to anyone, about a third object to such transparency as a privacy matter, and some cite increased complexities in what is revealed and what must be protected.

In a recent special report on security, Ilene Klein, chief information security officer of Phoenix, said that In between public and sensitive data, "you have information that is for internal use only, like employee data, some of that is public information.

“For example, my salary is public information. But public information is interspersed with confidential information," Klein continued. "My Social Security number is part of that employee record, but that’s confidential, so that field needs to be protected. If somebody requests my employee record, the public part can be released, but my Social Security number has to be redacted. And hopefully, my home address would be redacted as well."

End of update; original article follows

On Thursday the Empire Center for New York State Policy launched a Web site that reveals everything financial about New York State government including:

  • Complete list of state government employees, job titles and salaries.
  • Teachers' union and superintendent contracts for nearly every school district in New York State.
  • What the Empire Center terms the Legislature's "pork-barrel community projects" spending for 2008-09.
  • Internal operations expenditures by the state Assembly and Senate.

The site SeeThroughNY.net may soon add local government financial data as well.

The Empire Center is a project of the Manhattan Institute, a conservative think tank, and the site is bound to be controversial as most public employees feel publishing their salaries by name is an invasion of privacy. However, the state's Freedom of Information Law states: "The people's right to know the process of governmental decision-making and to review the documents and statistics leading to determinations is basic to our society. Access to such information should not be thwarted by shrouding it with the cloak of secrecy or confidentiality. The Legislature therefore declares that government is the public's business and that the public, individually and collectively and represented by a free press, should have access to the records of government in accordance with the provisions of this article."


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Comments

Som Karamchetty, PHD    |    Commented August 5, 2008

This is perhaps a good first step. Government employees' performance standards, performance appraisals, and their respective supervisor's names should also be available to citizens because the latter are paying with their taxes; are the consumers of their products and services; and are affected by the processes.

Som Karamchetty, PHD    |    Commented August 5, 2008

This is perhaps a good first step. Government employees' performance standards, performance appraisals, and their respective supervisor's names should also be available to citizens because the latter are paying with their taxes; are the consumers of their products and services; and are affected by the processes.

Som Karamchetty, PHD    |    Commented August 5, 2008

This is perhaps a good first step. Government employees' performance standards, performance appraisals, and their respective supervisor's names should also be available to citizens because the latter are paying with their taxes; are the consumers of their products and services; and are affected by the processes.

Anonymous    |    Commented August 6, 2008

"Government employees' performance standards, performance appraisals, and their respective supervisor's names should also be available to citizens because the latter are paying with their taxes; are the consumers of their products and services; and are affected by the processes." Are these types of employee information available to shareholders of publicly-held corporations for the employees of those corporations? somehow, I doubt it. You seek to eliminate for public-sector employees a measure of privacy that private-sector workers take for granted -- and, in so doing, create one more disincentive for public service. Congratulations.

Anonymous    |    Commented August 6, 2008

"Government employees' performance standards, performance appraisals, and their respective supervisor's names should also be available to citizens because the latter are paying with their taxes; are the consumers of their products and services; and are affected by the processes." Are these types of employee information available to shareholders of publicly-held corporations for the employees of those corporations? somehow, I doubt it. You seek to eliminate for public-sector employees a measure of privacy that private-sector workers take for granted -- and, in so doing, create one more disincentive for public service. Congratulations.

Anonymous    |    Commented August 6, 2008

"Government employees' performance standards, performance appraisals, and their respective supervisor's names should also be available to citizens because the latter are paying with their taxes; are the consumers of their products and services; and are affected by the processes." Are these types of employee information available to shareholders of publicly-held corporations for the employees of those corporations? somehow, I doubt it. You seek to eliminate for public-sector employees a measure of privacy that private-sector workers take for granted -- and, in so doing, create one more disincentive for public service. Congratulations.

Stephanie Adams    |    Commented August 6, 2008

That's an interesting take on privacy issues. Since my tax money also pays for food stamps, welfare, etc., I think the names and amounts of everyone receiving any kind of government assistance should be published as well. I want to know who I am supporting. I also want to know how they spend their money since, it's actually my money and I have a right to know, so let's publish exactly what they spend the money on as well.

Stephanie Adams    |    Commented August 6, 2008

That's an interesting take on privacy issues. Since my tax money also pays for food stamps, welfare, etc., I think the names and amounts of everyone receiving any kind of government assistance should be published as well. I want to know who I am supporting. I also want to know how they spend their money since, it's actually my money and I have a right to know, so let's publish exactly what they spend the money on as well.

Stephanie Adams    |    Commented August 6, 2008

That's an interesting take on privacy issues. Since my tax money also pays for food stamps, welfare, etc., I think the names and amounts of everyone receiving any kind of government assistance should be published as well. I want to know who I am supporting. I also want to know how they spend their money since, it's actually my money and I have a right to know, so let's publish exactly what they spend the money on as well.

Someone Who Appears on the list    |    Commented August 6, 2008

Som Karamchetty, PHD - Who are your consumers of your products and services? I'd like to know so, I too can be a consumer of your product and services so I can "feel" entitled to know how much you make and how well your supervisor thinks you perform. Yes, people have a right to know the aggregate of government spending, or an actual salary paid for a given title, related to a service function so that they be able to be able decide whether or not a given government service is worth the expenditure but names to a salary. No benefit can be derived from that knowledge as it relates to those who "are affected by the processes" performed by the government. BTW I can't wait for the problems facing me because my name is there -- like credit fraud and stolen identity (with a name, employer name and a salary - one has only to look up an address in the phone book to apply for a loan in that name) or issues related to the erroneous reporting of an hourly rate credited to my name just for starter. So Som Karamchetty, PHD, if you please, as your consumer, can I have your salary and your performance appraisals? I might be in need of loan to get me of my stolen identity woes...

Someone Who Appears on the list    |    Commented August 6, 2008

Som Karamchetty, PHD - Who are your consumers of your products and services? I'd like to know so, I too can be a consumer of your product and services so I can "feel" entitled to know how much you make and how well your supervisor thinks you perform. Yes, people have a right to know the aggregate of government spending, or an actual salary paid for a given title, related to a service function so that they be able to be able decide whether or not a given government service is worth the expenditure but names to a salary. No benefit can be derived from that knowledge as it relates to those who "are affected by the processes" performed by the government. BTW I can't wait for the problems facing me because my name is there -- like credit fraud and stolen identity (with a name, employer name and a salary - one has only to look up an address in the phone book to apply for a loan in that name) or issues related to the erroneous reporting of an hourly rate credited to my name just for starter. So Som Karamchetty, PHD, if you please, as your consumer, can I have your salary and your performance appraisals? I might be in need of loan to get me of my stolen identity woes...

Someone Who Appears on the list    |    Commented August 6, 2008

Som Karamchetty, PHD - Who are your consumers of your products and services? I'd like to know so, I too can be a consumer of your product and services so I can "feel" entitled to know how much you make and how well your supervisor thinks you perform. Yes, people have a right to know the aggregate of government spending, or an actual salary paid for a given title, related to a service function so that they be able to be able decide whether or not a given government service is worth the expenditure but names to a salary. No benefit can be derived from that knowledge as it relates to those who "are affected by the processes" performed by the government. BTW I can't wait for the problems facing me because my name is there -- like credit fraud and stolen identity (with a name, employer name and a salary - one has only to look up an address in the phone book to apply for a loan in that name) or issues related to the erroneous reporting of an hourly rate credited to my name just for starter. So Som Karamchetty, PHD, if you please, as your consumer, can I have your salary and your performance appraisals? I might be in need of loan to get me of my stolen identity woes...

an angry state worker    |    Commented August 12, 2008

I can't believe that our salaries have to be public knowledge by our names. It is not necessary for everyone I know to be privy to my paycheck. I agree by title or grade but not by name. We are private people just like anyone else. With our names out there and where we work we have the ability of being a target for a number of scams. Thank you State of New York for again giving us just the kick we need to want to keep coming to work everyday. I also agree we should know exactly who everyone receiving any state or county aid is. What ever happen to the privacy of information act.

an angry state worker    |    Commented August 12, 2008

I can't believe that our salaries have to be public knowledge by our names. It is not necessary for everyone I know to be privy to my paycheck. I agree by title or grade but not by name. We are private people just like anyone else. With our names out there and where we work we have the ability of being a target for a number of scams. Thank you State of New York for again giving us just the kick we need to want to keep coming to work everyday. I also agree we should know exactly who everyone receiving any state or county aid is. What ever happen to the privacy of information act.

an angry state worker    |    Commented August 12, 2008

I can't believe that our salaries have to be public knowledge by our names. It is not necessary for everyone I know to be privy to my paycheck. I agree by title or grade but not by name. We are private people just like anyone else. With our names out there and where we work we have the ability of being a target for a number of scams. Thank you State of New York for again giving us just the kick we need to want to keep coming to work everyday. I also agree we should know exactly who everyone receiving any state or county aid is. What ever happen to the privacy of information act.

Step12    |    Commented August 21, 2008

Let's take this HIGHER, and grab the US Government civilian employees also. THEN, the military. THEN...... I mean, might as well blast EVERYBODY'S salary out there. I know I earn my paycheck since I have no "slacker clause" built iinto my job responsibilities.

Step12    |    Commented August 21, 2008

Let's take this HIGHER, and grab the US Government civilian employees also. THEN, the military. THEN...... I mean, might as well blast EVERYBODY'S salary out there. I know I earn my paycheck since I have no "slacker clause" built iinto my job responsibilities.

Step12    |    Commented August 21, 2008

Let's take this HIGHER, and grab the US Government civilian employees also. THEN, the military. THEN...... I mean, might as well blast EVERYBODY'S salary out there. I know I earn my paycheck since I have no "slacker clause" built iinto my job responsibilities.

Anonymous    |    Commented August 21, 2008

I am a NYS employee [originally from private industry] who makes about 15K less than market [based on my knowledge and experience]. It is unfortunate that SeeThroughNY.net visitors will not have that information.

Anonymous    |    Commented August 21, 2008

I am a NYS employee [originally from private industry] who makes about 15K less than market [based on my knowledge and experience]. It is unfortunate that SeeThroughNY.net visitors will not have that information.

Anonymous    |    Commented August 21, 2008

I am a NYS employee [originally from private industry] who makes about 15K less than market [based on my knowledge and experience]. It is unfortunate that SeeThroughNY.net visitors will not have that information.

Jim    |    Commented August 21, 2008

While I do not agree with the action in practice (because I do work for the State), I agree in principle. I also feel that if the sponsoring parties were truly motivated by the public's right to know, they would also publish the salaries of every employee of every company who benefits directly from a government subsidy, tax break, grant, procurement, etc... as these companies are using public funds to profit and grow.

Jim    |    Commented August 21, 2008

While I do not agree with the action in practice (because I do work for the State), I agree in principle. I also feel that if the sponsoring parties were truly motivated by the public's right to know, they would also publish the salaries of every employee of every company who benefits directly from a government subsidy, tax break, grant, procurement, etc... as these companies are using public funds to profit and grow.

Jim    |    Commented August 21, 2008

While I do not agree with the action in practice (because I do work for the State), I agree in principle. I also feel that if the sponsoring parties were truly motivated by the public's right to know, they would also publish the salaries of every employee of every company who benefits directly from a government subsidy, tax break, grant, procurement, etc... as these companies are using public funds to profit and grow.

Anonymous    |    Commented August 24, 2008

That's an interesting take on privacy issues. Since my tax money also pays for food stamps, welfare, etc., I think the names and amounts of everyone receiving any kind of government assistance should be published as well. I want to know who I am supporting. I also want to know how they spend their money since, it's actually my money and I have a right to know, so let's publish exactly what they spend the money on as well.

Anonymous    |    Commented August 24, 2008

That's an interesting take on privacy issues. Since my tax money also pays for food stamps, welfare, etc., I think the names and amounts of everyone receiving any kind of government assistance should be published as well. I want to know who I am supporting. I also want to know how they spend their money since, it's actually my money and I have a right to know, so let's publish exactly what they spend the money on as well.

Anonymous    |    Commented August 24, 2008

That's an interesting take on privacy issues. Since my tax money also pays for food stamps, welfare, etc., I think the names and amounts of everyone receiving any kind of government assistance should be published as well. I want to know who I am supporting. I also want to know how they spend their money since, it's actually my money and I have a right to know, so let's publish exactly what they spend the money on as well.

Anonymous    |    Commented October 10, 2008

And now there's a hiring freeze! Any state position vacated cannot be filled by a state worker - saving the salary must really help the budget! That position gets filled by a political appointee who earns TWICE what the state worker would have received. Is anyone publishing how many political appointees have recently been added? And how much they are being paid? It's not only mindboggling, but budget-busting!! Go Paterson!

Anonymous    |    Commented October 10, 2008

And now there's a hiring freeze! Any state position vacated cannot be filled by a state worker - saving the salary must really help the budget! That position gets filled by a political appointee who earns TWICE what the state worker would have received. Is anyone publishing how many political appointees have recently been added? And how much they are being paid? It's not only mindboggling, but budget-busting!! Go Paterson!

Anonymous    |    Commented October 10, 2008

And now there's a hiring freeze! Any state position vacated cannot be filled by a state worker - saving the salary must really help the budget! That position gets filled by a political appointee who earns TWICE what the state worker would have received. Is anyone publishing how many political appointees have recently been added? And how much they are being paid? It's not only mindboggling, but budget-busting!! Go Paterson!

public servant    |    Commented November 18, 2008

My state wouldn't publish rank and file employees' salaries, because they're so low the employees would be embarrassed, and it might stir an open discussion ending in more equitable wages. Incidently, regarding a comment about making others such as the feds, the military .... Actually, military salaries, rank/years service, etc. are all public record and have been from the beginning.

public servant    |    Commented November 18, 2008

My state wouldn't publish rank and file employees' salaries, because they're so low the employees would be embarrassed, and it might stir an open discussion ending in more equitable wages. Incidently, regarding a comment about making others such as the feds, the military .... Actually, military salaries, rank/years service, etc. are all public record and have been from the beginning.

public servant    |    Commented November 18, 2008

My state wouldn't publish rank and file employees' salaries, because they're so low the employees would be embarrassed, and it might stir an open discussion ending in more equitable wages. Incidently, regarding a comment about making others such as the feds, the military .... Actually, military salaries, rank/years service, etc. are all public record and have been from the beginning.

Constitutionalist    |    Commented November 18, 2008

The agenda behind this and other privacy-invasive laws is to accustom the populace to less and less confidentiality for their private affairs. This movement has a ratchet effect - think about it: have there been any laws passed in the past decade or so that allow citizens greater privacy in their personal affairs? On the contrary, it has become progressively more difficult to maintain a sphere of privacy. It's public employees' privacy that is at risk now, but private-sector people will not always be safe from such intrusions.

Constitutionalist    |    Commented November 18, 2008

The agenda behind this and other privacy-invasive laws is to accustom the populace to less and less confidentiality for their private affairs. This movement has a ratchet effect - think about it: have there been any laws passed in the past decade or so that allow citizens greater privacy in their personal affairs? On the contrary, it has become progressively more difficult to maintain a sphere of privacy. It's public employees' privacy that is at risk now, but private-sector people will not always be safe from such intrusions.

Constitutionalist    |    Commented November 18, 2008

The agenda behind this and other privacy-invasive laws is to accustom the populace to less and less confidentiality for their private affairs. This movement has a ratchet effect - think about it: have there been any laws passed in the past decade or so that allow citizens greater privacy in their personal affairs? On the contrary, it has become progressively more difficult to maintain a sphere of privacy. It's public employees' privacy that is at risk now, but private-sector people will not always be safe from such intrusions.

Glenn    |    Commented November 19, 2008

SeeThrough is going far beyond the letter and the spirit of the Freedom of Information Act.The Act specifies: 1) the process of governmental decision making, and 2) statistics leading to determinations. When my agency's policy makers (commissioners and directors) are deciding policies for my agency, they aren't the least bit interested in my particular salary by name. When it comes to financial data, all they care about is the aggregate: do they have enough money in this year's budget to accomplish their mission. Ask any Human Resources Mangagement staff in any government agency anywhere, whether they are allowed to give out everyone's personal salaries to any anonymous person who phones in.

Glenn    |    Commented November 19, 2008

SeeThrough is going far beyond the letter and the spirit of the Freedom of Information Act.The Act specifies: 1) the process of governmental decision making, and 2) statistics leading to determinations. When my agency's policy makers (commissioners and directors) are deciding policies for my agency, they aren't the least bit interested in my particular salary by name. When it comes to financial data, all they care about is the aggregate: do they have enough money in this year's budget to accomplish their mission. Ask any Human Resources Mangagement staff in any government agency anywhere, whether they are allowed to give out everyone's personal salaries to any anonymous person who phones in.

Glenn    |    Commented November 19, 2008

SeeThrough is going far beyond the letter and the spirit of the Freedom of Information Act.The Act specifies: 1) the process of governmental decision making, and 2) statistics leading to determinations. When my agency's policy makers (commissioners and directors) are deciding policies for my agency, they aren't the least bit interested in my particular salary by name. When it comes to financial data, all they care about is the aggregate: do they have enough money in this year's budget to accomplish their mission. Ask any Human Resources Mangagement staff in any government agency anywhere, whether they are allowed to give out everyone's personal salaries to any anonymous person who phones in.

   |    Commented December 18, 2008

After review of some of the highest paid state employees there should be an across the board cut with graduating percentages for those making more than 100k. In my opinion there are state staff on the payroll that clearly don't warrant the high cost to the state. It seems to me that the Department of Health is extremely top heavy. I think the option has to be put on the table.

   |    Commented December 18, 2008

After review of some of the highest paid state employees there should be an across the board cut with graduating percentages for those making more than 100k. In my opinion there are state staff on the payroll that clearly don't warrant the high cost to the state. It seems to me that the Department of Health is extremely top heavy. I think the option has to be put on the table.

   |    Commented December 18, 2008

After review of some of the highest paid state employees there should be an across the board cut with graduating percentages for those making more than 100k. In my opinion there are state staff on the payroll that clearly don't warrant the high cost to the state. It seems to me that the Department of Health is extremely top heavy. I think the option has to be put on the table.

Anonymous    |    Commented January 17, 2009

This is great. In New Hampshire, the Manchester Union Leader has been publishing State worker salaries for years. It is nice to now have the same openness here.

Anonymous    |    Commented January 17, 2009

This is great. In New Hampshire, the Manchester Union Leader has been publishing State worker salaries for years. It is nice to now have the same openness here.

Anonymous    |    Commented January 17, 2009

This is great. In New Hampshire, the Manchester Union Leader has been publishing State worker salaries for years. It is nice to now have the same openness here.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 6, 2009

this site is no longer accessable...what happened?

Anonymous    |    Commented February 6, 2009

this site is no longer accessable...what happened?

Anonymous    |    Commented February 6, 2009

this site is no longer accessable...what happened?

John Acumen    |    Commented December 2, 2009

Is anyone else here as shocked at the amount of City employees, making over 150K a year. Taking a brief look at the MTA salaries, there are over 50 engineers and repairman who are making over 200K a year. Are you serious. Is that even defendable? how can they be taxing us average citizens who make less than 60K a year to pay for hundreds of train engineers/drivers that make over 200k a year.

John Acumen    |    Commented December 2, 2009

Is anyone else here as shocked at the amount of City employees, making over 150K a year. Taking a brief look at the MTA salaries, there are over 50 engineers and repairman who are making over 200K a year. Are you serious. Is that even defendable? how can they be taxing us average citizens who make less than 60K a year to pay for hundreds of train engineers/drivers that make over 200k a year.

John Acumen    |    Commented December 2, 2009

Is anyone else here as shocked at the amount of City employees, making over 150K a year. Taking a brief look at the MTA salaries, there are over 50 engineers and repairman who are making over 200K a year. Are you serious. Is that even defendable? how can they be taxing us average citizens who make less than 60K a year to pay for hundreds of train engineers/drivers that make over 200k a year.

Anonymous    |    Commented December 9, 2009

I agree with transparency and open government. We need to be open about what government does and how money is spent. I work hard, putting in long hours in my job for the government. I am not embarassed or impressed by my salary - the money is less than job offers I have had from the private sector, but I like working for the public good rather than working to make a profit.

I have now had the experience of acquaintances I barely know loudly proclaiming my salary at a party. If you want a well-run, efficient, low-cost government you need to attract good people to work for it -- do you really think this helps?

Some of the suggestions from others for providing salaries by job titles, or for people above a certain level might be a good compromise.

Anonymous    |    Commented December 9, 2009

I agree with transparency and open government. We need to be open about what government does and how money is spent. I work hard, putting in long hours in my job for the government. I am not embarassed or impressed by my salary - the money is less than job offers I have had from the private sector, but I like working for the public good rather than working to make a profit.

I have now had the experience of acquaintances I barely know loudly proclaiming my salary at a party. If you want a well-run, efficient, low-cost government you need to attract good people to work for it -- do you really think this helps?

Some of the suggestions from others for providing salaries by job titles, or for people above a certain level might be a good compromise.

Anonymous    |    Commented December 9, 2009

I agree with transparency and open government. We need to be open about what government does and how money is spent. I work hard, putting in long hours in my job for the government. I am not embarassed or impressed by my salary - the money is less than job offers I have had from the private sector, but I like working for the public good rather than working to make a profit.

I have now had the experience of acquaintances I barely know loudly proclaiming my salary at a party. If you want a well-run, efficient, low-cost government you need to attract good people to work for it -- do you really think this helps?

Some of the suggestions from others for providing salaries by job titles, or for people above a certain level might be a good compromise.

Anonymous    |    Commented December 9, 2009

I am in IL and they started publishing our salaries just recently and we feel violated but there is nothing we can do about it. So as many others - we deal with it the best way we can.

Anonymous    |    Commented December 9, 2009

I am in IL and they started publishing our salaries just recently and we feel violated but there is nothing we can do about it. So as many others - we deal with it the best way we can.

Anonymous    |    Commented December 9, 2009

I am in IL and they started publishing our salaries just recently and we feel violated but there is nothing we can do about it. So as many others - we deal with it the best way we can.

Anonymous    |    Commented December 15, 2009

Unless the individual is in an elective position, I don't understand why it's necessary for the people to know the names associated with a particular salary in order to understand the government process.

In a prior job, my name and salary were released as part of an FOIA request. Next thing I knew, my name was in the statewide paper decrying my "abuse of public funding." At the time, I made only about $65K per year. Beyond the career repercussions, it was embarrassing. In my field of work, that salary is abominably low. So people who didn't know me were all over me for making too much money, and people who did were sniggering because I didn't demand more. That's the only kind of behavior I've ever seen from publishing FOIA data with personally identifiable information. Nothing helpful comes from it.

Anonymous    |    Commented December 15, 2009

Unless the individual is in an elective position, I don't understand why it's necessary for the people to know the names associated with a particular salary in order to understand the government process.

In a prior job, my name and salary were released as part of an FOIA request. Next thing I knew, my name was in the statewide paper decrying my "abuse of public funding." At the time, I made only about $65K per year. Beyond the career repercussions, it was embarrassing. In my field of work, that salary is abominably low. So people who didn't know me were all over me for making too much money, and people who did were sniggering because I didn't demand more. That's the only kind of behavior I've ever seen from publishing FOIA data with personally identifiable information. Nothing helpful comes from it.

Anonymous    |    Commented December 15, 2009

Unless the individual is in an elective position, I don't understand why it's necessary for the people to know the names associated with a particular salary in order to understand the government process.

In a prior job, my name and salary were released as part of an FOIA request. Next thing I knew, my name was in the statewide paper decrying my "abuse of public funding." At the time, I made only about $65K per year. Beyond the career repercussions, it was embarrassing. In my field of work, that salary is abominably low. So people who didn't know me were all over me for making too much money, and people who did were sniggering because I didn't demand more. That's the only kind of behavior I've ever seen from publishing FOIA data with personally identifiable information. Nothing helpful comes from it.

Anonymous    |    Commented February 25, 2010

State employees are overpayed, private employees should not foot their benefits bill, and they should pay taxes like the rest of us. Or the structure should be brought to an end!

Anonymous    |    Commented February 25, 2010

State employees are overpayed, private employees should not foot their benefits bill, and they should pay taxes like the rest of us. Or the structure should be brought to an end!

Anonymous    |    Commented February 25, 2010

State employees are overpayed, private employees should not foot their benefits bill, and they should pay taxes like the rest of us. Or the structure should be brought to an end!

Anonymous    |    Commented February 25, 2010

I've seen - and continue - to see the abuse in salaries, both privately owned companies and state/civil service salaries. How can someone whose salary is 90K a year, earn another 40K - PER YEAR - in overtime? I thought "salaried" employees were exempt from getting overtime!

Anonymous    |    Commented February 25, 2010

I've seen - and continue - to see the abuse in salaries, both privately owned companies and state/civil service salaries. How can someone whose salary is 90K a year, earn another 40K - PER YEAR - in overtime? I thought "salaried" employees were exempt from getting overtime!

Anonymous    |    Commented February 25, 2010

I've seen - and continue - to see the abuse in salaries, both privately owned companies and state/civil service salaries. How can someone whose salary is 90K a year, earn another 40K - PER YEAR - in overtime? I thought "salaried" employees were exempt from getting overtime!

STATE PRISON SALARY ABUSER !    |    Commented March 4, 2010

To the idiot that writes that public employees should pay taxes too. WE DO!

Anyone that has a problem with my salary of 50,000. can choose to take my place working in a maximum security state prison. We have many open positions!

STATE PRISON SALARY ABUSER !    |    Commented March 4, 2010

To the idiot that writes that public employees should pay taxes too. WE DO!

Anyone that has a problem with my salary of 50,000. can choose to take my place working in a maximum security state prison. We have many open positions!

STATE PRISON SALARY ABUSER !    |    Commented March 4, 2010

To the idiot that writes that public employees should pay taxes too. WE DO!

Anyone that has a problem with my salary of 50,000. can choose to take my place working in a maximum security state prison. We have many open positions!

Anonymous    |    Commented May 27, 2011

this site makes me sick to my stomach. New York departement of state plan reviewers. do nothing all day but review plans and sit on there ass, and type bull shit on paper. did you see how much they make. $80 G's per year. they need a salary cut, isnt this department a waste of tax payer money. Isnt this why we code books and code enforcement officers.

Sam Karmashetti    |    Commented December 3, 2011

This is perhaps a good first step. Government employees' performance standards, performance appraisals, and their respective supervisor's names should also be available to citizens because the latter are paying with their taxes; are the consumers of their products and services; and are affected by the processes. Deal with it.

Sharon Rwanda    |    Commented December 3, 2011

You actually pay for your food stamps and welfare check, WOW! I get mine free monthly!

jimmy zee    |    Commented December 12, 2011

you know nothing

publiclytrue@yahoo.com    |    Commented January 2, 2012

I whole heartedly agree!!!

ED AUSTIN    |    Commented January 17, 2012

Since the potential is there that I spend a lot of money buying the goods or services from you or your employer, and in doing so, I contribute to your wages. Do I have the right to your personal and financial information? NO!! So you don't have the right to demand mine!!

Albany    |    Commented February 6, 2012

Rwanda - this person is paying for YOUR government assistance.

No way - that's MY New Year's Resolution, too!    |    Commented February 22, 2012

Well at least some people can be proud of their accomplishments. I don't think any one of us truly has anonymity. With current min. wage increase issues, high unemployment rates and an undereducated workforce--- Be proud that: You have a Job making more than minimum Wage!

Anonymous    |    Commented May 18, 2012

I have to remain anonymous because I am trying to hide from my abusive ex-boyfriend who tried to kill me. I would like to thank New York State government for helping my ex-boyfriend to find me. It seems as if I will have to start packing my bags to move again. Once again thanks for making my life a hell.

Anonymous    |    Commented May 18, 2012

I have to remain anonymous because I am trying to hide from my abusive ex-boyfriend who tried to kill me. I would like to thank New York State government for helping my ex-boyfriend to find me. It seems as if I will have to start packing my bags to move again. Once again thanks for making my life a hell.

Anonymous    |    Commented May 18, 2012

I too am also sick to my stomach. This site has made my life hell. I have been trying to hide from my abusive ex-boyfriend who tried to kill me. I would like to thank New York State government for helping my ex-boyfriend to find me. It seems as if I will have to start packing my bags to move again. Once again thanks for making my life a hell.

Anonymous    |    Commented May 18, 2012

Yes it is shocking how much they are making. I am also a NYS employee, but only make $20,000 per year. I don't feel that I should be punished because of people who make over $150,000 per year. This site has made my life hell. I have been trying to hide from my abusive ex-boyfriend who tried to kill me. This is no longer possible, because of this site, he now knows where I work and live. It seems as if I will have to start packing my bags to move again. I would like to thanks NYS government for making my life a hell.

Anonymous    |    Commented May 18, 2012

I totally agree with you. This site was not a good idea. I make less than $20,000 per year. I dont feel that I should be punished for being a NYS employee. Because of this site, my abusive ex-boyfriend now knows where I work and live. I am now forced to move and find another job because I fear for my life.

Privacy Concerns    |    Commented July 9, 2012

I agree with Someone Who Appears on the list. Has anyone considered the potential for malicious use of publicized employee records? Public employee records like this could be data mined for personal info & potentially open the door for the targeted profiling of government employees for identity theft or other fraud crimes. At least anonymize this information by removing the employees' names; this would both protect employees while still providing data for the public scrutiny of government spending. See a more recent article about the Arkansas public records site at http://www.govtech.com/budget-finance/New-Arkansas-Site-Reveals-State-Salaries.html

Privacy Concerns    |    Commented July 9, 2012

Even if you are angry or shocked at how much someone earns compared to you, it does not justify publishing public employee names. You would be just as shocked and angry if the the data was anonymous. And no one's privacy or security (against ID theft or fraud) would be potentially compromised.

A Government Worker in Florida    |    Commented December 7, 2012

This is uncalled for. Salary information by title or pay grade or account type or whatever is fine, the public has a right to know. There is no need, however, to openly publish my name attached to any of that information. It invites abuse from more than just the potential of identity theft.

A NYC Employee    |    Commented January 15, 2013

OMG its a shame that the titles listed are NOT what they use at the work place. On top of that how does Administrative Director of Residential Care Dept of Juvenile Justice get pay increase annual and the staff working with the kids as officers securing detention DONT and we are out of a contract. The Commissioners and the Assistant and Deputy Associate Commissioner salary stayed the same. We are ACS employees merged 2010 and in 2011 we are under Dept Juvenile Justice STUPID. IM OUTRAGED!

Alex    |    Commented April 15, 2013

Now, time for the PRIVATE industries to do the same. Let anyone see who earns what.

Super Duper    |    Commented April 21, 2013

Since the Wall Street Banks bankrupted themselves then required billions in handouts from the US Taxpayer I demand to know the salaries of all employees at the Wall Street firms. Furthermore, since US Tax Dollars to go pay our soldiers, the same. The same goes for the "defense contractors" that are taking tax dollars, from the CEO to the over-time paid line-worker. A former poster also said those on the gov't dole and food stamps, we want a full record. What's good for the goose is good for the gander...or can we say what this push is truly - an effort to dismantle the unions sponsored by the "non-partisan" CATO Institute, the Koch Brothers who fund the Cato Institute, Bill Gates, Robert Murray, Pearson and all the folks who'd like to dismantle public education and trade unions in the US? Wake up, folks.

A NYS EMPLOYEE    |    Commented May 16, 2013

Not only do I agree ABSOLUTELY with Super Duper but I'd also like to let Som Karamchetty, PHD know that taxpaying is not only done by private industry employees. It may surprise PHd to know that as a state employee I also pay taxes. Every government employee is a taxpayer and this employee is tired of being used as the shiny distraction by governors, senators & congressman who are ALL government employees who believe no government job is good, except their own.

A veteran    |    Commented May 16, 2013

Under the current mayor all NYC agencies increased the number of overpaid managers and their salaries by 60-70%.


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