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Start of Wi-Fi Service on Seattle/Bremerton Ferry




Washington State Ferries

January 8, 2008 By

Parsons, in conjunction with Washington State Ferries, has announced that Wi-Fi service commenced on the Seattle/Bremerton route on December 24, 2007. The service spans the entire ferry route through Rich Passage and across Puget Sound.

"Providing consistent signal strength across this 15.6-mile stretch of Puget Sound has proven to be a real technological challenge, but with a significant investment in equipment that has created ten new shoreline access points, we are now providing a robust signal from dock to dock on the Bremerton runs," said Bob Davis, Parsons vice president. "We're also pleased to note that the Seattle/Bainbridge route received Wi-Fi transmission upgrades during the latest phase of service improvement."

Parsons is offering one week of free Wi-Fi service to commuters who sign up to take a short survey on Wi-Fi use and preferences. Interested ferry riders can sign up at www.wsf-wifi.com.

Washington State Ferries' Wi-Fi has become the largest commercial, over-the-water Wi-Fi system in the world. Routes include Edmonds/Kingston, Mukilteo/Clinton, the newly improved Seattle/Bainbridge route, plus the new Seattle/Bremerton route. Parsons plans to add the Fauntleroy/Vashon/Southworth run before the end of January with signal feeds from the route's three terminals plus five shoreline feed points.

Parsons is one of the largest 100% employee-owned management, engineering, and construction companies in the United States and operates Wi-Fi installations in 30 airports across the United States and Canada. Parsons also manages the world's largest railroad Wi-Fi system, providing service on VIA Rail Canada for more than 460 trains per week across a 14,000-kilometer network.



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