Government Technology

Washington Counties to Launch Video Voter Guides



July 7, 2009 By

Washington voters in Kitsap, Grant, Pacific, Pend Oreille and Walla Walla counties can view a video version of their local voters' pamphlet beginning July 20.

Voters will also be able to click on any of the candidates appearing on the ballot to watch, listen and read a statement directly from the participating candidates. The Washington Secretary of State's office assisted with funding and local colleges helped with filming.

"We are excited about the launch of the video voter guide," State Elections Director Nick Handy said. "It continues the Secretary of State's vision of making voter information accessible and compelling. This new voter tool embraces the future by providing voters the ability to easily watch and listen to every participating candidate appearing on their ballot who chooses to submit a video."

Nine counties have applied for the grant funding. The grant program is designed to assist all voters with disabilities gain equal access to voting and elections-related information.


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