Government Technology

    Digital Communities
    Industry Members

  • Click sponsor logos for whitepapers, case studies, and best practices.
  • McAfee

What's The Worst New Internet Law?



August 19, 2009 By

Next month, if someone books a hotel room in New York City over the Internet, the travel site will have to pay a 20 percent tax on service fees in addition to the normal taxes and fees on business booked by telephone, according to NetChoice, a Washington D.C.-based coalition of trade associations and eCommerce businesses. And the Maine State Legislature passed a law requiring "verifiable parental consent" before collecting personal information from teenagers. According to NetChoice that law would force Web sites to stop providing college information, test preparation services and class rings, since sites lack the means to obtain verifiable consent.

"The Internet is increasingly under attack as lawmakers seek to mandate technological behaviors, impose new taxes and otherwise restrict the free flow of information and commerce online," said Steve DelBianco, executive director of NetChoice in a release. The group has compiled a top 10 list of "ugly laws" that include:

  • Digital Download Taxes in Colorado and Washington
  • North Carolina Digital Downloads Tax Bill -- HB 558/S 487
  • North Carolina Tickets Bill -- SB 99
  • Massachusetts Online Advertising Bill -- HB 313
  • North Carolina Advertising Nexus Proposal
  • New York Tax on Online Resume Searches


| More

Comments

Mark Tallman    |    Commented August 20, 2009

Sales tax for Internet purchases, for those from businesses with an FOB in the respective Customer's state, should be MORE than enough. The Internet IS the engine that will most likely power the economy for the foreseeable future...unless Democrats (yes, it is mostly tax-and-spend Democrats) do not get stomped in 2010, else they will kill the golden goose. They kill everything that can help grow the economy.

Mark Tallman    |    Commented August 20, 2009

Sales tax for Internet purchases, for those from businesses with an FOB in the respective Customer's state, should be MORE than enough. The Internet IS the engine that will most likely power the economy for the foreseeable future...unless Democrats (yes, it is mostly tax-and-spend Democrats) do not get stomped in 2010, else they will kill the golden goose. They kill everything that can help grow the economy.

Mark Tallman    |    Commented August 20, 2009

Sales tax for Internet purchases, for those from businesses with an FOB in the respective Customer's state, should be MORE than enough. The Internet IS the engine that will most likely power the economy for the foreseeable future...unless Democrats (yes, it is mostly tax-and-spend Democrats) do not get stomped in 2010, else they will kill the golden goose. They kill everything that can help grow the economy.


Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Digital Cities & Counties Survey: Best Practices Quick Reference Guide
This Best Practices Quick Reference Guide is a compilation of examples from the 2013 Digital Cities and Counties Surveys showcasing the innovative ways local governments are using technological tools to respond to the needs of their communities. It is our hope that by calling attention to just a few examples from cities and counties of all sizes, we will encourage further collaboration and spark additional creativity in local government service delivery.
Wireless Reporting Takes Pain (& Wait) out of Voting
In Michigan and Minnesota counties, wireless voting via the AT&T network has brought speed, efficiency and accuracy to elections - another illustration of how mobility and machine-to-machine (M2M) technology help governments to bring superior services and communication to constituents.
Why Would a City Proclaim Their Data “Open by Default?”
The City of Palo Alto, California, a 2013 Center for Digital Government Digital City Survey winner, has officially proclaimed “open” to be the default setting for all city data. Are they courageous or crazy?
View All