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By Robert Bell, John Jung, Louis Zacharilla: Intelligent Communities are those which have - whether through crisis or foresight - come to understand the enormous challenges of the Broadband Economy, and have taken conscious steps to create an economy capable of prospering in it. They are not necessarily big cities or famous technology hubs. They are located in developing nations as well as industrialized ones, suburbs as well as cities, the hinterland as well as the coast.

Winnipeg, Canada: Pursuing Economic Growth Through Innovation and Collaborationnt Community at the Epicenter

September 17, 2014 By John Jung

It is well known that Winnipeg is at the epicenter of North America’s geography. Even its Centerport concept, a major inland multi-modal logistic initiative places itself smack dab in the center of North America. Nobody can claim that better than Winnipeg. As self-described by Winnipeggers, it is also a physically isolated city in the cold weather climate of Canada that has produced an interesting and unique culture that celebrates its diversity as well as its isolation. Some would say that this is the reason for its locally collaborative and internationally competitive “can-do” attitude. It is the capital of a province rich in agricultural and natural resources and has advanced infrastructure, including access to broadband and Wi-Fi mesh that a large city of its size would be expected to have. But as the largest and main city in Manitoba, Winnipeg seems to be much bigger than its 800,000 population would suggest. It actively pursues economic growth through innovation and collaborative industry, government and education partnerships.

 

For instance, Winnipeg has formed partnerships linking employers such as Canadian Tire to the University of Winnipeg and other public-private groups to improve and leverage its supply of young, skilled employees. Through these partnerships it also attempts to better equip its large and growing aboriginal population for opportunities to prosper. One of these public-private R&D partnerships, the Composite Innovation Centre (CIC) has developed high-performance composites based on agricultural materials such as hemp and flax, which reduces costs for major employers like Boeing and Magellan Aerospace. Through CIC’s success, a national consortium, Canadian Composites Manufacturing R&D was created to conduct pre-competitive R&D for multiple companies and training programs channeling new talent for these partnerships. 

From a knowledge creation and innovation perspective, Sisler High School’s Digital Voices Project promotes traditional storytelling as a vital part of its aboriginal culture, while providing students with digital media skills training. The Wii Chiiwaakanak Learning Centre provides aboriginals and immigrants’ access to computers and training while the Winnipeg Library and private sector programs similarly provide access to technologies and training. The First Nations also benefit from the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) headquarters in Winnipeg. It is the first national aboriginal TV network and its social media offshoot, APTN Digital Drum, allows aboriginal youth to express their cultural identity and connect with each other. Winnipeg is also home to North America’s oldest ballet company, famous musicians and a vibrant center for the arts and culture movement, molded through its isolation and pioneer spirit.

So does its isolation help in creating Winnipeg’s “can-do” attitude? Certainly it reflects its focus on being ambitious and successful, despite its location “in the middle of nowhere”. It also gives it a unique position to be bold and seek its position globally as a city to be reckoned with.

I had an opportunity to visit Winnipeg earlier this year as part of the ICF Top 7 Intelligent Communities Site Visits. I was given first-hand exposure at this can-do attitude, from the exciting maker spaces for its new entrepreneurs to the wonderful cultural facilities of the First Nations. But nothing that I have seen in several years can compare to the audacious and controversial Canadian Museum for Human Rights, which will open its doors in Winnipeg on September 19, 2014.  This awe-inspiring complex looms over this Intelligent Community like a cultural temple. This $351-million museum is massive in size (2230 square meters) and has been compared to the Guggenheim Spain in Bilbao for its potential impact on the city’s tourism industry and its global brand. I would agree. It clearly is humbling as you enter the building from below and rise to a crescendo into the bowls of the building with its airy interior and sculpted spire.

As ICF’s theme for 2014 was Community as Canvas, it was most appropriate to visit Canada’s first national museum to be built since 1967 in Winnipeg. As national museums go, they usually are located in a country’s capital or largest cities, yet here it was – the first national museum to be established outside the Ottawa region. The purpose of the museum is also quite inspiring. It is the only museum in the world devoted to engaging visitors in the topic of human rights as an issue and aspiration, as opposed to focusing on a specific event, movement or victims.

Designed by architect Antoine Predock, my hosts refer to its design as a reflection of the prairies and the mountains of this nation, its reach to the clouds and its important position on this historic site on First Nations treaty land. The interior is open and bright with exhibitions developed by some of the world’s top museum designers, such as Ralph Appelbaum who designed the Washington D.C. Holocaust Memorial Museum. The Canadian Human Rights Museum also created new ways to design, bid and construct the complex through collaborative technologies. The extreme geometric complexity made virtual design and collaborative construction techniques necessary. High speed broadband capabilities, evolving technology and global collaboration became essential for detailed pre-planning and visualization of its complex construction.The project team overcame logistical challenges through real-time collaboration linking Winnipeg with Toronto, New York and even Mongolia, reducing travel time and costs and benefitting from expedited decision-making. The use of advanced technology and design concepts will also help to enhance the art of storytelling when the Museum opens this week, with the goal of leading to a better future. The Museum focuses on key topics such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and aboriginal concepts of humanity. The latter is showcased in a unique circular theatre with a 360-degree film. According to Martin Knelman at the Toronto Star: “Winnipeg needed a game changer and this museum could transform the prairie city into one of Canada’s unmissable destinations”. I agree that this complex could become a game-changer for Winnipeg, but Winnipeg’s “can-do” attitude will always be at the epicenter of its game. 

 


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When is it Fair to Deny Broadband to a Neighborhood?

September 9, 2014 By Robert Bell

Americans in Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas City, Kansas are now using broadband at the kind of speeds once enjoyed only by South Koreans, Japanese, Hongkongers and, believe it or not, Latvians.  As customers of Google Fiber, they can buy gigabit services delivering 1,000 Mbps service.  That is 100 times the average American broadband speed reported by Akamai in April 2014. 

By leapfrogging to gigabit speeds, Google is upending the competitive broadband market in the US. It has lots of help from dozens of municipal networks in places like Chattanooga (TN), Danville (VA), Springfield (MO) and Santa Monica (CA).  It’s about time, some would say.  But the really intriguing part of the Google Fiber story is not its speed – it’s the way it is being deployed.  
 
According to a story in the Wall Street Journal, the deal that Google strikes with its Fiber Cities has a unique clause: it specifically exempts the company from offering universal service.  Instead, Google divides the service area into “fiberhoods” of a few hundred homes and asks residents to pay $10 to preregister for service.  If interest exceeds a threshold, from 5-25% of households, Google rolls trucks and fibers up the fiberhood. If not, the trucks say in the garage.
 
The flexibility to build where it chooses, plus more efficient and cheaper technologies, has let Google deploy service for about 20% less than Verizon’s competing FIOS deployment.  Lower upfront costs translate into lower business risk, higher profits and more coverage.  Gigabit service costs US$70 per month in Google’s Kansas City fiberhoods, compared with $120-150 per month in AT&T’s Dallas-Fort Worth system.  
 
According to the company, Google conducted preregistration in 364 fiberhoods in the two Kansas Cities and all but 16 of them met the threshold.  But, not surprisingly, participation varies by income. According to a survey by brokerage firm Bernstein Research, 83% of households in a neighborhood with median household income of $116,000 signed up.  In another neighborhood, with media income of $24,000, only 27% subscribe. 
 
So here’s a question: is Google playing fair?  Is Google’s approach just a means for the company to cherry-pick the most profitable customers – or is it a refreshingly new strategy to get ultrafast broadband into the market faster? 
 
Each of us will have an answer.  Here’s mine: I think it is a refreshingly new strategy.  Because anything that lowers upfront costs tends to lead to lower prices, higher profits and – most important of all – more coverage. 
 
Google’s approach also puts the onus of universal service where it properly belongs: on government as representative of the people.  I find that refreshing.  Is it not a bizarre logic to require companies to take on money-losing customers as a condition of entering a business?  In return for that condition, companies have historically demanded and won monopoly control of the market.  And we all know how well monopolies and even duopolies work out for their customers. Encouraging monopoly markets to form is a bit like doing a deal with the devil.  It gets you want you want – but at a higher price than you think.
 
If we believe in universal service, then it is the obligation of the public sector to pay for it.  And it is better in the long run to pay for it transparently: through subsidies, through incentives that further reduce the risk of deployment for private carriers, and in some cases by constructing networks and leasing capacity to carriers. 
 
Google’s move is hardly the last word, nor the only way to get more and cheaper broadband coverage.  But isn’t it the kind of innovation that deserves fair consideration?  Let me know what you think by posting a comment to my discussion on LinkedIn’s ICF Group

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From Smart to Intelligent Mobility

August 28, 2014 By John Jung

Urban transportation and efficient logistics is at the heart of a vital and thriving metropolitan area. However, unbridled growth can result in congestion, pollution and undesirable daily stress which can evolve into impoverished environments leading to inefficiencies, unproductive land-uses and a diminished quality of life for its citizens. Solving the mobility challenges of moving people, goods and services is one of the most pressing issues in modern and growing cities around the world.
 
Trade is inextricably linked to transport. Trading goods and services and its related transport is one of the oldest of human activities. Mobility challenges impacting trade and thereby potentially impacting the attraction and retention of investment and talent can seriously undermine the sustainability of the city and region from an environmental, fiscal and social perspective. By undertaking smart technologies to manage urban assets such as roads, traffic lights and related transportation systems, it may be possible to improve efficiencies, increase transport productivity and harness enhanced mobility options. The side benefits of this may also include cost savings, improved safety and enhanced customer service.
 
International examples of smart transportation-related technologies include coordinated traffic management control systems such as developed in Tokyo, Barcelona and Rio de Janeiro; managed goods mobility and separated road systems in the USA; vehicle-to-vehicle and community-to-vehicle communications; independent transport guidance systems; as well as GIS-based information systems for improved congestion prediction techniques. However broadband-based smart technologies used to monitor and measure data and support GIS-related systems are not a revolution. They have been around for decades; but they are getting better, faster and more affordable. Companies like IBM, Siemens and Cisco are assisting municipalities with their asset management and monitoring transportation movement. Through analyzing the big data derived from monitoring systems, cities are able to make informed decisions to improve efficiencies as well as identify ways of saving municipalities considerable resources to manage traffic flows, pollution and unnecessary alteration to roadways and related land-uses.
 
These improvements may make a city’s budget chief and his asset manager very happy, but most of the city’s citizens may not be aware of any of these changes. But imagine an advanced mobility and logistics ecosystem that not only manages traffic flows, congestion and related municipal assets, but adds to the overall quality of life through engaging people in every aspect of city life. The Intelligent Community movement encourages communities to look at their approach to the evolution of their cities from a more holistic perspective. Urban and regional infrastructure, such as roads, rail, seaports, airports and now ultra-high speed broadband are vital elements to a modern, thriving community. However, ICF also advocates the need for communities to build in a better understanding of the impact of the Internet of Things, encouraging an inclusive and highly collaborative environment promoting innovation and creativity and employment of education capabilities needed to create the talent related to advanced mobility and logistics.  Within an environment promoting mobility related education and innovation, comes research. For instance, Cisco, Google and BMW are experimenting with the driverless vehicle. These are vehicles that are essentially computers with long lasting lithium batteries on wheels that will transport people and products without the need for drivers.
 
Other examples include driverless buses in Eindhoven in the Netherlands; the research advances of mobility experiments in California and the work of WatCAR, the University of Waterloo Centre for Automotive Research in Canada. Other forms of movement from rail-based High Speed Rail systems and Light Rapid Transit (LRT) to Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), elevated Monorails and strategic city based Shuttle Services, such as airport and industrial park shuttle services are making impacts in communities throughout the world. Some of these systems are being touted as essential to attract and retain talent, as well as investment in their cities. Restricted Transport use lanes and High-Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes on highways are also advocated. City and region-wide bike paths are increasingly becoming part of a community’s toolkit of mobility options. Cities that have rivers and lakes are blessed with the opportunities to use ferry systems as part of their movement nomenclature. Cities are also moving people with moving sidewalks, elevated pedwalks and unique pedestrian linkages as part of bridge systems. In addition to these, cities are expanding sidewalks, developing tourist –oriented walking trails with GIS supported information displays, music systems and other cultural attractions.
 
Human evolution and the growth of our towns, villages and cities follow closely the evolution of trade. Trade developed the cities of Europe, Asia and the Americas. Furs traded in the northern regions of Canada and the United States along converging waterways created settlements which today have become major trading centers such as Minneapolis, Winnipeg and Toronto. Railways opened the west and created hubs such as Chicago for grain and livestock. Roads expanded our cities into the outer reaches of our regions and our seaports and airports connected our citizens and shipped our traded goods around the world. But transport needs to be considered beyond road, rail, ferries and even airports.
 
Mobility in our communities should not simply be dependent on physical improvements to vehicles, roadways and rail systems, thereby potentially limiting the economy, talent and ultimately the relevance of some cities on this planet. Accordingly, new methods of transporting products and services in a knowledge economy must also be considered. Today, with the provision of satellite technologies and undersea cables, our goods and services have expanded to include data, video expression, games and ideas. Digital media applications, virtual businesses and advanced systems with new disruptive technologies, such as additive manufacturing (3D printing) will depend on use and application of high speed broadband, shifts in planning of global supply chains as well also on education to create the talent for these new disruptive and highly innovative businesses. In addition to available infrastructure, cities will also depend on the support of its citizenry and local leadership to help create and nurture its innovative ecosystem to help it to become a vibrant, competitive and sustainable region. Consequently, the future of Intelligent Communities depend on their ability to resolve their mobility challenges - from roads linking the center of these cities with its suburbs and hinterlands to ultra-high-speed broadband access linking them with the rest of the world.
 
Intelligent Communities harness intelligent infrastructure, including provision of robust high-speed broadband with its local talent to innovate and create new products and services. These highly innovative and creative communities are providing great opportunities for new wealth creation, such as in Tokyo, Berlin, London, San Francisco and New York where digital and advanced ICT-enabled industries cluster. Many of these cities are creating new products and services through the convergence of talent from around the world and are now distributing them virtually over broadband networks. Intelligent Communities are cities where everyone is encouraged to participate and benefit from its innovation ecosystem. Through excellent public policies, advocacy and good governance, these cities also exude confidence and stability that helps to attract the investment and talent to continuously improve the environment and ecosystem that makes these cities successful Intelligent Communities.
 
ICF’s theme this year: The Revolutionary Community: How Intelligent Communities are Reinventing Urban and Rural Planning will be looking at all aspects of planning and development, including mobility challenges and success stories. Watch for more blogs on these and other topics that will help in raising awareness about the importance of properly planning for and developing your community as we prepare our cities, regions and rural areas to meet the needs of the coming transformative decades ahead.

 


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The Next Trail Along the Digital Divide

July 25, 2014 By Louis Zacharilla

Along with the successful economic migrations from poor to lower middle class in large swaths of the world, the rich really are getting richer. Many are getting rich because of the way knowledge is being “discovered,” deployed and productized. While most of the world still waits for access, the Digital Divide has moved on. A line is now being drawn between those with access and those who can interpret and understand information once connected. These people know how to put it into play economically. They have moved from the classroom to the canvas. They make raw material purposeful, and create a ladder for some as their work pulls it away from others. Most of the consequences are unintended, but all impact the community.

 
In the June 22nd issue of the New York Times there were two stories, a few column inches apart, that reaffirmed the gap between those with access and those who understand the power of access to thrive. I do not know if it was the editor’s decision to lay the story out this way, but the contrast was apparent. In one story, an Arizona (USA) woman making $10 per hour (when she could find work) was jailed upon getting into her car after an interview with an insurance company. If Shanesha Taylor had gotten that job (and she was confident that the interview had gone well), it would have given her real wages, health insurance coverage for her two children and dignity. The two kids were in the car because she could not afford day care and chose to take them along while she had her interview. The law reasoned that this was endangerment. Not unreasonable in Scottsdale, Arizona, where the car temperature was estimated at 103 degrees (F.) But people did not forget that this was a story about the Divide too. Through the Internet, money was raised for her defense and the media’s light found its way to Arizona. A settlement was reached a few days ago. She will not do jail time.
 
A few clicks below her story there was one profiling Yahoo Food and its marketing team. Their challenge was a bit different: they needed to decide whether to lure eyeballs to their site with a story about the history of foods from the ancient Silk Trail, or whether to publish a guide to cheese fries and other snacks that go well with ranch dressing. Decisions, decisions! Yahoo Food, whose sutra of wisdom includes “Treat Meat as a Condiment,” is an example of what we call the “lovely jobs,” in our new book, Brain Gain.
 
While we, the information rich, may be confident that our work is the equivalent of a divine endowment and will be rewarded, no matter how insipid, those stuck on the ladder trying desperately to use knowledge to find a job or to become more educated are not guaranteed success. Google CEO Eric Schmidt is “very worried” about this. His data suggests that the problem is getting worse. “If you look at the most recent studies of American economic growth, 99 percent of the people saw essentially no economic improvement over the last decade,” he wrote in his new book The New Digital Age.
 
What he didn’t say is that even among those of us in the 1% - including his company - yet another divide has formed. This is the dissatisfaction with knowledge work, or at least with “technology’s” impositions within it. Our mental health, psyches and purpose as individuals seem to be casualties of a crisis of the soul. It is a new inner conflict. Among even successful knowledge workers, the thinning of psychic reward is driving us toward burnout. We are grateful to be knowledge workers, of course, but too tired to give thanks! Tony Schwartz, whose Energy Project studies levels of satisfaction and sustainable engagement in the workplace, reported that only 30% of Americans feel engaged with their work. Globally, that number is a mere 13% Most people simply feel “overwhelmed.” In a study of 12,000 workers worldwide, 66% said that were absolutely unable to focus on one thing at a time at work – or probably anywhere else. The percentages of those feeling a sense of belonging, of connectedness to a community and a sense of overall satisfaction is low. Burnout has reached all the way to the CEO’s office.
 
What are we to make of the new wake-up calls? One is the impact on our communities.
 
I have been writing for years that communities were out of energy and out of balance until the concept of the Intelligent Community movement came along to raise the red flag. The Energy Project’s data confirms this. Even the foodies at Yahoo are too tired to produce much social capital when they get home after 16 hours on the job. And Ms. Taylor? Well, she needs to find a way to support her two children. Both suffer psychic fatigue.
 
While waves of middle classes continue to rise and thrive outside the borders of the mighty USA, the smiles on their faces as they shop their way through new stores and crank away in their comfortable cubicles, may fade. Their nations are catching up economically and technologically, and that is good. They are reaping the benefits from their parents’ generation. But what is next?
 
What we need to observe and to plan for in cities and communities is the creation of wealth that is sustainable because it comes with tools to use knowledge effectively in the next iteration of the economy. This includes ways to enable a deeper, more meaningful engagement at work, on the Internet and with our local governments and institutions. Oh yes, and with ourselves.

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Urban Planners and the Revolutionary City

July 21, 2014 By John Jung

The revolutionary city! This is not a city under siege or under threat by terrorists. This is a city that uses all its efforts to understand, strategically plan for and actively position itself to truly transform and actively apply all of the ICT enabled opportunities and all of the smart systems and infrastructure at its disposal to allow its citizens to benefit from efficiencies, security, conveniences, experiences and opportunities available to them. It is also a city that works with its universities and all other educational institutions to be able to benefit from the knowledge, talent and resources available to them to help position the community with a knowledge-centric focus. This is a city where all its bureaucrats and other leaders pull together with a sense of collaboration; use all their efforts to be transparent though excellence in public policy; and create clear, concise and visionary directions for its community that all can embrace and act upon. This is a community that embraces an innovation and creativity ecosystem and is caring and sensitive to issues of health, environmental sustainability, safety and fairness to everyone. This is a community that an investor or someone with significant talent decides on with confidence.

Here are some well-planned cities that provide the confidence to companies and talented people to invest in: San Francisco, New York, Suwon, Taipei, Singapore, Melbourne, Toronto, Manchester, Chattanooga, Waterloo, Dundee, Austin, Stratford, Eindhoven, Barcelona, Glasgow, Columbus, Philadephia, Calgary, Issy-les-Moulineaux (Paris), Mitaka (Tokyo), Gangnam (Seoul), Stockholm, Quebec City, Taichung, Winnipeg, Ottawa, plus 100 other Intelligent Communities.
 
These well-planned cities are all Intelligent Communities. Think of Intelligent Communities = Excellence in Urban Planning and Urban Design.
 
Providing deliberate certainty through well thought through and crafted policies, land use decisions and the basis for creating the best environments possible in our communities are key constructs of urban and regional planning. Hence the revolutionary communities of tomorrow are those that are well planned for and being developed as Intelligent Communities today.
 
What would make cities and regions truly revolutionary is if we could see the best of its urban and regional planning and urban design implemented, especially using all of the planning tools, ultra-high-speed broadband connectivity and related technologies available to them. These might be off the shelf and in some cases, leveraging entirely new innovations with new uses and applications to demonstrate pilots and create new concepts and experiences in urban liveability. But it would also require superb leadership and collaboration throughout and a special sense of the community nurturing an innovation ecosystem that would help to differentiate it as being among the best in the world. This would capture the imagination of investors, scholars and talented people to want to be part of these types of communities.
 
Urban planning is not a science; it’s a combination of the arts, science, philosophy, sociology, economics and politics. Its theories and practices, delivered in the form of plans are a reflection of a language focused on the use of land by its citizens and the design of the urban environment upon which the site is to be developed on as well as reflected in its impact on the surrounding area. But as planning concerns itself with everything around it - including air, water and infrastructure in, around and through it, it must take a true 360 degree, all-encompassing look at everything related to its development. Therefore it must even look at its history and current relationship with other neighbouring land-uses and the people and things around it. Just as Cisco speaks of the Internet of Everything, so does Urban Planning. Planners must consider everything that makes up a community (or at least it should) in making their planning recommendations. Like the concepts of sustainability – everything connects to everything else.
 
A plan is a statement of intent; if given the mandate by the leadership and the funds to see it through, it can be very powerful. Current planning directions range from Urbanism or New Urbanism, Intelligent Urbanism, Liveable Cities, and so forth. Whatever is currently vogue in different parts of the world, planners must consider in context all of the elements of their unique community they represent in order to successfully deliver and execute their plans. For instance, Urban Designers consider built form, colour, lighting, building materials, art and technology in context to the urban situation in which they are planning for as well as the relationship between buildings, uses, sight-lines and the physical ground spaces in three dimensional form. This is also akin to the idea of liveable cities in which good urban design principles can create a high quality of life in dense but well-designed urban environments, such as Singapore. Planners and their colleagues in city design, development and management today also employ Computer-aided Design (CAD), Geographic information Systems (GIS), leverage the Internet of Things technologies to design for managing mobility – especially during rush hour traffic and the demands of supply chain logistics; smart technologies to develop, monitor and analyze big data, especially as part of incorporating smart utilities and smart systems into their communities; high-speed broad applications that offer new community development unique communications, entertainment and other new urban experiences; produce 3D planning models for enhanced public engagement, including those who become involved via online and web-based experiences; and some are looking into future building design options through holography and visual-support technologies. Building or using traditional environments and installing new technologies create exciting new environments that create a new experience that attracts investors and talent to a place. For instance, traditional brick and beam environments and reused lofts as live/work spaces attract artists and software code writers alike as long as high-speed broadband applications are also planned for and incorporated into the design of the facilities. Traditional open space and bike paths incorporate technologies for communications, directions, safety, and exciting new environmental experiences, such as art applications utilizing advanced software technologies, broadband communications and advanced visual projection techniques. Artist Daan Roosegaarde’s Van Gogh inspired illuminated bikepath near Eindhoven, in the Netherlands, and Ryan Holladay’s BLUEBRAIN location-based music composition using smartphones are only the beginning of the type of new experiences that our revolutionary communities will be exploring. These and other capabilities in urban environments make urban spaces and experiences attractive to people who want to live and work in these environments. Accordingly, it’s not a surprise that attractive and highly–in-demand intelligent and revolutionary urban centers are growing at an incredible pace.
 
Considering that nearly 70% of the world’s population is expected to live in urban centers by 2050, planners are going to have to do more than traditional planning efforts to meet these demands. Intelligent Communities understand these challenges and are making great strides to undertake serious strategic planning that focus on highly efficient mobility of all kinds, connectivity, accommodating all types of housing needs and ensuring sustainable development approaches to be able to support these changes. Urban Planners must be at the forefront of these efforts. As such, they must also be at the forefront of developing their communities into intelligent and revolutionary communities.

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Intelligent Communities

About the Intelligent Community Forum
The Intelligent Community Forum is a think tank that studies the economic and social development of the 21st Century community. Whether in industrialized or developing nations, communities are challenged to create prosperity, stability and cultural meaning in a world where jobs, investment and knowledge increasingly depend on advances in communications. For the 21st Century community, connectivity is a double-edge sword: threatening established ways of life on the one hand, and offering powerful new tools to build prosperous, inclusive and sustainable economies on the other. ICF seeks to share the best practices of the world's Intelligent Communities in adapting to the demands of the Broadband Economy, in order to help communities everywhere find sustainable renewal and growth. More information can be found at www.intelligentcommunity.org.

Robert Bell
Robert Bell is co-founder of the Intelligent Community Forum, where he heads its research and content development activities. He is the author of ICF's pioneering study, Benchmarking the Intelligent Community, the annual Top Seven Intelligent Communities of the Year white papers and other research reports issued by the Forum, and of Broadband Economies: Creating the Community of the 21st Century. Mr. Bell has also authored articles in The Municipal Journal of Telecommunications Policy, IEDC Journal, Telecommunications, Asia-Pacific Satellite and Asian Communications; and has appeared in segments of ABC World News and The Discovery Channel. A frequent keynote speaker and moderator at municipal and telecom industry events, he has also led economic development missions and study tours to cities in Asia and the US.

John Jung
ICF co-founder John G. Jung originated the Intelligent Community concept and continues to serve as the Forum's leading visionary. Formerly President and CEO of the Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance and Calgary Economic Development Authority, he is a registered professional urban planner, urban designer and economic developer. He leads regular international business missions to US, European, Asian, Indian and Australian cities, and originated the ICF Immersion Lab program. John is a regular speaker at universities and conferences and serves as an advisor to regional and national leaders on Intelligent Community development. The author of numerous articles in planning and economic development journals, he has received global and Toronto-based awards for his work in collaboration and strategic development and sits on numerous task forces and international advisory boards.

Louis Zacharilla
ICF co-founder Louis Zacharilla is the creator and presenter of the annual Smart21, Top Seven and Intelligent Community Awards and oversees ICF's media communications and development programs. He is a frequent keynote and motivational speaker and panelist, addressing audiences of tech, academic and community leaders around the world, and writes extensively for publications including American City & County, Continental Airline's in-flight magazine and Municipal World. His frequent appearances in the electronic media have included both television and radio in South Korea, China and Canada. He has served as an adjunct professor at Fordham University in New York and is a Guest Lecturer at Polytechnic University's Distinguished Speaker Series. He holds a Masters Degree from the University of Notre Dame.