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By Robert Bell, John Jung, Louis Zacharilla: Intelligent Communities are those which have - whether through crisis or foresight - come to understand the enormous challenges of the Broadband Economy, and have taken conscious steps to create an economy capable of prospering in it. They are not necessarily big cities or famous technology hubs. They are located in developing nations as well as industrialized ones, suburbs as well as cities, the hinterland as well as the coast.

Communities at the Center, Communities at the Edge

January 30, 2013 By

On January 23, for the 12th consecutive time, ICF named its Top7 Intelligent Communities of the Year.  There were two European cities, two Asian communities and three North Americans.  That’s a pretty average spread – but there was little else average about the group.

clientuploads/Images/Bell-Blog-Reboot-Comm-2.jpgFor one thing, they skewed large.  Over the past five years, the Top7 averaged 440,000 in population.  In 2013, the average population of the Top7 was 1.2 million because, for the first time, they included three cities with more than 2 million inhabitants. 

Something else about the 2013 Top7 stood out.  There was a dramatic and instructive spread between what I think of as the Center and the Edge.  Toronto, Canada’s finance capital, is an example of a Top7 community clearly at the Center.  The biggest city in Canada, it is the hub of a region of 6 million people that produced C$286 billion in GDP in 2012. 

Oulu, on the other hand, is a community on the Edge.  It is in Finland, a country whose entire population is slightly outnumbered by that of the Greater Toronto Area.  It takes six hours to reach Oulu by car from Helsinki, Finland’s business and political capital – considerably more time than it takes to go from Oulu to the Arctic Circle only 200 km north.  But it is a highly successful tech hub with a global reputation for innovation in wireless and a growing roster of other technologies.  Utterly different from Toronto, it is just as great a place to live, to work and to raise a family. 

In more than a decade of work with communities, we have seen that success is not a matter of size or wealth.  Those things are not causes – they are results.  Their success is the product of a belief that they are at the burning center of the human universe.  They have something special to offer the world and are hungry to see what the world has to offer them.  They have the power to think big even if, in physical terms, they stay small.

One of our first-time Smart21 communities – which did not yet make it into the Top7 – offers a great example.  It is the city of Mitchell, home to 15,000 souls on the plains of South Dakota USA. 

Mitchell is the Center of a region on the Edge – one that has lost 30% of its population over the past 70 years.  But Mitchell’s fate is not that of its region.  With a willing private communications company and a Federal broadband stimulus grant, Mitchell developed a fiber-to-the-premise network serving every business and residence.  Its university and technical school have leveraged the city’s agricultural heritage into academic leadership in precision agriculture, in which farmers use satellite and remote sensing data to develop a highly detailed portrait of their land and apply that knowledge to boost yields. 

They also work closely with city government, business, and public institutions to promote digital literacy and supply the highly trained workforce in increasing demand by area businesses.  These include software companies, data centers and consulting firms attracted by Mitchell’s network or fostered by its construction.  Alone in its region, Mitchell has grown both in population and prosperity.

Today, “the middle of nowhere” could just as easily be a street corner in a crumbling city as a town on the prairie.  Which is the Center and which is the Edge?  In a global economy woven tightly together by information and communication technology, it is no longer so easy to tell.


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Intelligent Communities

About the Intelligent Community Forum
The Intelligent Community Forum is a think tank that studies the economic and social development of the 21st Century community. Whether in industrialized or developing nations, communities are challenged to create prosperity, stability and cultural meaning in a world where jobs, investment and knowledge increasingly depend on advances in communications. For the 21st Century community, connectivity is a double-edge sword: threatening established ways of life on the one hand, and offering powerful new tools to build prosperous, inclusive and sustainable economies on the other. ICF seeks to share the best practices of the world's Intelligent Communities in adapting to the demands of the Broadband Economy, in order to help communities everywhere find sustainable renewal and growth. More information can be found at www.intelligentcommunity.org.

Robert Bell
Robert Bell is co-founder of the Intelligent Community Forum, where he heads its research and content development activities. He is the author of ICF's pioneering study, Benchmarking the Intelligent Community, the annual Top Seven Intelligent Communities of the Year white papers and other research reports issued by the Forum, and of Broadband Economies: Creating the Community of the 21st Century. Mr. Bell has also authored articles in The Municipal Journal of Telecommunications Policy, IEDC Journal, Telecommunications, Asia-Pacific Satellite and Asian Communications; and has appeared in segments of ABC World News and The Discovery Channel. A frequent keynote speaker and moderator at municipal and telecom industry events, he has also led economic development missions and study tours to cities in Asia and the US.

John Jung
ICF co-founder John G. Jung originated the Intelligent Community concept and continues to serve as the Forum's leading visionary. Formerly President and CEO of the Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance and Calgary Economic Development Authority, he is a registered professional urban planner, urban designer and economic developer. He leads regular international business missions to US, European, Asian, Indian and Australian cities, and originated the ICF Immersion Lab program. John is a regular speaker at universities and conferences and serves as an advisor to regional and national leaders on Intelligent Community development. The author of numerous articles in planning and economic development journals, he has received global and Toronto-based awards for his work in collaboration and strategic development and sits on numerous task forces and international advisory boards.

Louis Zacharilla
ICF co-founder Louis Zacharilla is the creator and presenter of the annual Smart21, Top Seven and Intelligent Community Awards and oversees ICF's media communications and development programs. He is a frequent keynote and motivational speaker and panelist, addressing audiences of tech, academic and community leaders around the world, and writes extensively for publications including American City & County, Continental Airline's in-flight magazine and Municipal World. His frequent appearances in the electronic media have included both television and radio in South Korea, China and Canada. He has served as an adjunct professor at Fordham University in New York and is a Guest Lecturer at Polytechnic University's Distinguished Speaker Series. He holds a Masters Degree from the University of Notre Dame.