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By Robert Bell, John Jung, Louis Zacharilla: Intelligent Communities are those which have - whether through crisis or foresight - come to understand the enormous challenges of the Broadband Economy, and have taken conscious steps to create an economy capable of prospering in it. They are not necessarily big cities or famous technology hubs. They are located in developing nations as well as industrialized ones, suburbs as well as cities, the hinterland as well as the coast.

It takes a Smart City to become an Intelligent Community

March 26, 2013 By

https://www.intelligentcommunity.org/clientuploads/Images/Jung-Blog-DesigningComm.gifAs I travel to meet cities and companies such as Siemens in Germany; Cisco and IBM in the USA and Canada; WIPRO, Tata and Tech Mahindra in India; Chunghwa in Taiwan and countless others in China, Australia and Brazil, I am absolutely amazed at how quickly “smart cities” has jumped onto everyone’s radar screens and part of the popular lexicon around the world. Back in the late 1980’s and early to mid-1990’s I was on a similar track with my “smart people, smart buildings and smart cities” initiatives which came together around SMART95 in Toronto and again in conferences in Silicon Valley and Calgary, among other places. We even started a Canadian Smart Cities Initiative in the mid-1990’s. But when we looked at the word SMART following the depth of discussion held at the SMART95 conference, we were challenged to go beyond just smart infrastructure. Over the years in the late 1990`s my fellow co-founders of ICF and I looked at the entire city and community development spectrum – from infrastructure and data to more holistic levels to engage discussion around the importance of higher education and skills development, involvement of research-based universities and the creation and expansion of knowledge-based industries; we focused on application of innovation and creativity in creating more vibrant and productive communities; and encouraged the importance of social and digital inclusion in creating a bridge to bring all the citizens of a community, state and country into the digital century and broadband economy. We embraced discussion around public advocacy and governance, collaboration, leadership, marketing and sustainability. We also discussed the concepts of liveability and the importance to look at scale when we consider the rural imperative. Over the years we at ICF and hundreds of communities and many more of its citizens around the world have come to refer to this higher order convergence as “Intelligent Communities”. 

Yet, in this day of the ubiquitous “smart city” promotion by companies like IBM and others, we are constantly asked what the difference is between smart cities and Intelligent Communities.

Back last summer, I referred in my August 28 2012 blog that there was a big difference between Smart Cities and Intelligent Communities. My colleague Robert Bell did an even better job in his exceptional three-part series on the difference between Smart Cities and Intelligent Communities (refer to ICF Blogs dated December 27, 2012; January 6 and January 15, 2013). From these you will quickly discern that the essential difference between Smart Cities and Intelligent Communities is the former`s focus on urban performance as it relates to urban competitiveness versus the latter`s role in creating a more holistic approach at city and community-building and collaboration.  By building and managing urban infrastructure with advanced monitoring and other intelligent systems, a new urban competitiveness is able to be developed based on urban performance and productivity. Urban, environmental and social capital emerge when they are properly valued and taken advantage of.  For instance, a city watermain is kept in excellent condition to be able to provide 100% distribution since no leaks are detected along its system and repaired immediately when identified; traffic patterns ease congestion and reduce carbon emissions through effective traffic management systems; smart meters in municipal buildings limit electrical waste; and so on. These raise the bar for everyone in the community; cities are flocking to their nearest technology partners to become "smarter-connected and/or sustainable cities” as promoted by IBM, CISCO and Siemens, among others.  A formula for creating smart cities based on urban performance may be seen as:

UP(urc[h+spi]) + ec  + sc = UC² 

In other words, Urban Performance (urban capital [hard and soft physical infrastructure] + environmental capital + skills capital = Urban Competitiveness (aka “Smart Cities”).

But to take it to the next level in creating Intelligent Communities, I could offer the following formula:

UC²+IC(t/SC)+InCr+DI+Av/M+S= IC

In other words, Smart Cities (Urban Competiveness) + Intellectual Capital [technology/social capital] + Innovation/Creativity + Digital Inclusion + Public Policy Advocacy/ Marketing + Sustainability Inputs = Intelligent Communities. A little tongue in cheek and fun with math, maybe, but it serves to explain that it takes more than urban performance systems to become an intelligent community. 

However, to keep it simple - when I look at the image developed by our friends in Stratford Canada that reads: “It takes a Smart City to become an Intelligent Community”, I cannot explain it better to people than this when they ask me the difference between the two.


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Comments

Gary Wreford    |    Commented March 29, 2013

I agree, as we move forward the Smart city will be the minimal entry point to cope with transportation and environment concerns etc. of a growing population and it will be the Intelligent Community that will provide the real quality of life improvements.


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About the Intelligent Community Forum
The Intelligent Community Forum is a think tank that studies the economic and social development of the 21st Century community. Whether in industrialized or developing nations, communities are challenged to create prosperity, stability and cultural meaning in a world where jobs, investment and knowledge increasingly depend on advances in communications. For the 21st Century community, connectivity is a double-edge sword: threatening established ways of life on the one hand, and offering powerful new tools to build prosperous, inclusive and sustainable economies on the other. ICF seeks to share the best practices of the world's Intelligent Communities in adapting to the demands of the Broadband Economy, in order to help communities everywhere find sustainable renewal and growth. More information can be found at www.intelligentcommunity.org.

Robert Bell
Robert Bell is co-founder of the Intelligent Community Forum, where he heads its research and content development activities. He is the author of ICF's pioneering study, Benchmarking the Intelligent Community, the annual Top Seven Intelligent Communities of the Year white papers and other research reports issued by the Forum, and of Broadband Economies: Creating the Community of the 21st Century. Mr. Bell has also authored articles in The Municipal Journal of Telecommunications Policy, IEDC Journal, Telecommunications, Asia-Pacific Satellite and Asian Communications; and has appeared in segments of ABC World News and The Discovery Channel. A frequent keynote speaker and moderator at municipal and telecom industry events, he has also led economic development missions and study tours to cities in Asia and the US.

John Jung
ICF co-founder John G. Jung originated the Intelligent Community concept and continues to serve as the Forum's leading visionary. Formerly President and CEO of the Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance and Calgary Economic Development Authority, he is a registered professional urban planner, urban designer and economic developer. He leads regular international business missions to US, European, Asian, Indian and Australian cities, and originated the ICF Immersion Lab program. John is a regular speaker at universities and conferences and serves as an advisor to regional and national leaders on Intelligent Community development. The author of numerous articles in planning and economic development journals, he has received global and Toronto-based awards for his work in collaboration and strategic development and sits on numerous task forces and international advisory boards.

Louis Zacharilla
ICF co-founder Louis Zacharilla is the creator and presenter of the annual Smart21, Top Seven and Intelligent Community Awards and oversees ICF's media communications and development programs. He is a frequent keynote and motivational speaker and panelist, addressing audiences of tech, academic and community leaders around the world, and writes extensively for publications including American City & County, Continental Airline's in-flight magazine and Municipal World. His frequent appearances in the electronic media have included both television and radio in South Korea, China and Canada. He has served as an adjunct professor at Fordham University in New York and is a Guest Lecturer at Polytechnic University's Distinguished Speaker Series. He holds a Masters Degree from the University of Notre Dame.