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NewsWatch: Cities and Counties -- Goosebusters




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May 6, 2011 By

Goose Busters Patrol Park

US Airways Flight 1549 was forced to land in the Hudson River in 2009 after geese flew into the engine. That led federal authorities to recommend the elimination of most of the geese within a seven-mile radius of the region’s major airports. A nonprofit group that runs Prospect Park hired Goose Busters to use dogs to harrass the geese and keep their numbers low so that they will not need to be killed. New York Times

Seattle Cracks Down on Yellow-Pages Deliveries

Under a new city ordinance, if a directory is delivered to a resident who has used the Stop Phone Books website at least 30 days before the scheduled delivery, yellow-pages publishers can be fined up to $125. The ordinance also imposes a 14-cent fee for every book delivered. Seattle Times

Wireless CEOs to Argue AT&T/T-Mobile Merger

CEOs from some of the nation's largest wireless companies will be testifying on Capitol Hill for and against the proposed $39 billion megamerger between AT&T and T-Mobile USA. On Wednesday, AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson and T-Mobile USA CEO Philipp Humm will argue in favor of the merger in front of the Senate Judiciary subcommittee, Sprint Nextel CEO Dan Hesse and regional carrier Cellular South CEO Hu Mena will be there to testify against the merger. CNET

Pinal Sheriff's Office Sees Eye Scanners as the Future (Video)

The Pinal County Sheriff's Office is now using eye scanners to track its nearly 1,500 jail inmates and verify the identity of the about 700 sex offenders living in the community. "If we're about to release somebody, we can't possibly know each and every person," Sheriff Paul Babeu said Thursday. "So (an iris scan) ensures with the highest degree of accuracy who we're releasing." Arizona Republic

Sanctuary Cities Ban Called Burden on Police

A day before the Texas House is set to vote on a bill that would ban so-called "sanctuary cities," law enforcement officials from across the state lined up Thursday to oppose the legislation. In a conference call with reporters, officials from El Paso, McAllen and Arlington said the bill amounted to legislators telling police how to do their jobs, that securing the border is a federal issue that shouldn't be funded solely by Texas taxpayers and that if police are viewed as immigration officials, they'll be less effective at community outreach. Houston Chronicle

Would $12,000 Convince You To Move Closer To Work?

Imagine that your work is in one of the more, shall we say, unsavory parts of Washington, D.C. and you live in a nice, quaint suburb in Virginia. Would you accept $12,000? Washington, D.C.'s Office Of Planning (OP) thinks you might -- so the organization is launching a pilot program that will match employer contributions of up to $6,000 to convince people to move closer to their work or public transit. Fast Company

States Back Off From Secure Communities Program

DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano, has said that the Secure Communities program -- under which the fingerprints of every person booked by the police are checked against Department of Homeland Security databases for immigration violations -- is mandatory and will be extended to all jurisdictions in the country by 2013. Gov. Pat Quinn of Illinois, however, said he was pulling his state out of the program, and  in California, where the program is already under way throughout the state, the Legislature is considering a bill that would allow counties or police agencies to choose whether to participate. New York Times

Feds Seek IT Cooperation with State and Local Governments

The Obama administration's push to improve customer service on its websites and other online services may include partnering with state and local governments to share software that serves similar functions, federal Chief Information Officer Vivek Kundra said on Thursday. NextGov


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