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Cleveland Clinic and Google Collaborate On Health Record Pilot



February 22, 2008 By

Cleveland Clinic, an academic medical institution and leader in health information technology, yesterday announced a collaboration with Google, to pilot features and services of a new health offering from Google. The Google offering, not yet publicly available, will assist providers like Cleveland Clinic to create a new kind of healthcare experience. According to a release from Cleveland Clinic, the pilot will put the patient in charge of his or her own health information.

Today, more than 100,000 Cleveland Clinic patients benefit from Cleveland Clinic's electronic personal health record (PHR) system called eCleveland Clinic MyChart. The pilot, an invitation-only opportunity offered to a group of Cleveland Clinic PHR users, plans to enroll between 1,500 and 10,000 patients. It will test secure exchange of patient medical record data such as prescriptions, conditions and allergies between their Cleveland Clinic PHR to a secure Google profile in a live clinical delivery setting. The ultimate goal of this patient-centered and controlled model is to give patients the ability to interact with multiple physicians, healthcare service providers and pharmacies.

"Patients are more proactively managing their own healthcare information," said C. Martin Harris, M.D., CIO, Cleveland Clinic. "At Cleveland Clinic, we strive to participate in and help to advance the national dialogue around a more efficient and effective national healthcare system. Utilizing Cleveland Clinic's PHR expertise, this collaboration is intended to help Google test features and services that will ultimately allow all Americans (as patients) to direct the exchange of their medical information between their various providers

without compromising their privacy."

The pilot will eventually extend Cleveland Clinic's online patient services to a broader audience while enabling the portability of patient data so patients can take their data with them wherever they go -- even outside the Cleveland Clinic Health System.

"We believe patients should be able to easily access and manage their

own health information," said Marissa Mayer, VP, search products and user experience, Google. "We chose Cleveland Clinic as one of the first partners to pilot our new health offering because as a provider, they already empower their patients by giving them online tools that help them manage their medical records online and coordinate care with their doctors."

By integrating with the Google platform, Cleveland Clinic is helping create national access to electronic medical records at no cost to the user or provider. The integration between the two systems will help deliver:

  • National Access -- A more efficient and effective healthcare system driven by a working interoperability model that moves electronic medical records from a closed model to one that is open and connected.
  • Consumer Empowerment -- A secure patient-centric, consumer-driven tool that will provide each consumer increased control of their medical care, without compromising their privacy. This will empower patients to actively manage their overall health.
  • 24/7 Access/Portability -- A Web portal with 24/7 access, capable of providing the consumer with an opportunity to actively engage in their health care, heightening the importance of quality care and service by providers.

"The partnership with Google is an example of true innovation in health care which brings value to patients and providers," said Delos M. "Toby" Cosgrove, M.D., president and CEO, Cleveland Clinic, and member of the Google Health Advisory Council. "As the volume of medical information available to patients increases, it becomes more important for doctors and patients to use this information in a way that empowers thepatient to be more collaborative with their care providers."


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Comments

Sean    |    Commented February 25, 2008

This article does not address the "information is power" mentality of Google. How much information can they access, use, stats, etc??? How do we the patient know what they are doing as far as rights of information, etc??

Sean    |    Commented February 25, 2008

This article does not address the "information is power" mentality of Google. How much information can they access, use, stats, etc??? How do we the patient know what they are doing as far as rights of information, etc??

Sean    |    Commented February 25, 2008

This article does not address the "information is power" mentality of Google. How much information can they access, use, stats, etc??? How do we the patient know what they are doing as far as rights of information, etc??

Benjamin Wright    |    Commented February 25, 2008

Maybe contract law could help patients enhance the privacy of their health records. http://hack-igations.blogspot.com/2008/02/contracts-for-patient-privacy.html

Benjamin Wright    |    Commented February 25, 2008

Maybe contract law could help patients enhance the privacy of their health records. http://hack-igations.blogspot.com/2008/02/contracts-for-patient-privacy.html

Benjamin Wright    |    Commented February 25, 2008

Maybe contract law could help patients enhance the privacy of their health records. http://hack-igations.blogspot.com/2008/02/contracts-for-patient-privacy.html

Anonymous    |    Commented February 25, 2008

Its funny that Google seems to think that this is a break through for health care information technology. The fact is that the VA already has a form of this technology, which they host themselves - called My Health e-vet

Anonymous    |    Commented February 25, 2008

Its funny that Google seems to think that this is a break through for health care information technology. The fact is that the VA already has a form of this technology, which they host themselves - called My Health e-vet

Anonymous    |    Commented February 25, 2008

Its funny that Google seems to think that this is a break through for health care information technology. The fact is that the VA already has a form of this technology, which they host themselves - called My Health e-vet


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