Government Technology

    Digital Communities
    Industry Members

  • Click sponsor logos for whitepapers, case studies, and best practices.
  • McAfee

Hacker Pleads Guilty to Identity Theft Charges



September 15, 2009 By

Indicted in August 2008, Albert Gonzalez, of Miami, recently pleaded guilty to multiple charges of hacking activity and credit card fraud in Massachusetts and New York. The charges include 19 counts of conspiracy, computer fraud, wire fraud, access device fraud and aggravated identity theft.

In what was called the largest and most complex identity theft case ever charged, Gonzalez and his co-conspirators stole more than 40 million credit and debit card numbers from U.S. retailers including TJX Companies, BJ's Wholesale Club, OfficeMax, Boston Market, Barnes & Noble, Sports Authority and Dave & Busters and sold them for fraudulent use. In addition, they engaged in ATM fraud by encoding the data on the magnetic stripes of blank cards and withdrawing tens of thousands of dollars at a time from ATMs.

"Technology has forever changed the way we do business, virtually erasing geographic boundaries," said Director Mark Sullivan of the U.S. Secret Service. "However, this case demonstrates that even in the cyber world, there is no such thing as anonymity."

According to the indictments to which Gonzalez pleaded guilty, he and his co-conspirators broke into the retail credit card payment systems using sniffer programs as well a technique known as "wardriving." Wardriving involves driving around in a car with a laptop computer looking for the accessible wireless networks of retailers.

Gonzalez faces charges in both Massachusetts and New York with a minimum sentence of 15 years in prison and a maximum of 25 years. He also faces heavy fines and forfeiture of personal property. Sentencing is scheduled for December 8, 2009.


| More

Comments

Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Digital Cities & Counties Survey: Best Practices Quick Reference Guide
This Best Practices Quick Reference Guide is a compilation of examples from the 2013 Digital Cities and Counties Surveys showcasing the innovative ways local governments are using technological tools to respond to the needs of their communities. It is our hope that by calling attention to just a few examples from cities and counties of all sizes, we will encourage further collaboration and spark additional creativity in local government service delivery.
Wireless Reporting Takes Pain (& Wait) out of Voting
In Michigan and Minnesota counties, wireless voting via the AT&T network has brought speed, efficiency and accuracy to elections - another illustration of how mobility and machine-to-machine (M2M) technology help governments to bring superior services and communication to constituents.
Why Would a City Proclaim Their Data “Open by Default?”
The City of Palo Alto, California, a 2013 Center for Digital Government Digital City Survey winner, has officially proclaimed “open” to be the default setting for all city data. Are they courageous or crazy?
View All