Government Technology

Making New York’s Lake George the World's 'Smartest Lake'


Scouting locations on New York's Lake George for placement of new sensors
IBM Research Scientist Harry Kolar (right), Sandra Nierzwicki-Bauer of the RPI Darrin Fresh Water Institute (center) and Eric Siy from The FUND to Save Lake George scout locations for new sensors that will be part of a three-year, multi-million dollar collaboration between the partners to make Lake George the world's "smartest" lake.

July 1, 2013 By

In the state of New York, one of the world’s most pristine natural ecosystems is being threatened. Road salt, storm water runoff and invasive species are harming Lake George -- a long, narrow lake at the southeast base of the Adirondack Mountains.

So to both understand and manage these threats, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, IBM and the FUND for Lake George have launched a three-year, multi-million dollar collaboration, called "The Jefferson Project at Lake George."

This project, according to a press release, includes an environmental lab with a monitoring and prediction system that will give scientists and the community a real-time picture of the health of the lake. The facility, according to the release, is expected to "create a new model for predictive preservation and remediation of critical natural systems on Lake George, in New York, and ultimately around the world."

To gain a scientific understanding of the lake, a combination of advanced data analytics, computing and data visualization techniques, new scientific and experimental methods, 3-D computer modeling and simulation, and historical data will be used -- as will weather modeling and sensor technology. 

The monitoring system is expected to give scientists a view of circulation models in Lake George -- something they've not seen before. These 3-D models could then be used to understand how currents distribute nutrients and contaminants across the 32-mile lake and their correlation to specific stressors, according to the release. The models also can be overlaid with historical and real-time weather data to see the impact of weather and tributary flooding on the lake's circulation patterns.


View Full Story

| More

Comments

Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Improving Emergency Response with Digital Communications
Saginaw County, Mich., increases interoperability, communication and collaboration with a digital voice and data network, as well as modern computer-aided dispatch.
Reduce Talk Time in Your Support Center by 40%
As the amount of information available to citizens and employees grows each year, so do customer expectations for efficient service. Contextual Knowledge makes information easy to find, dropping resolution times and skyrocketing satisfaction.
Emerging Technology Adoption in Local Government
In a recent survey conducted by Government Technology, 125 local government leaders shared their challenges, benefits and priorities when adopting emerging technologies such as cloud, mobility and IP. Read how your jurisdiction’s adoption of technology compares to your peers.
View All

Featured Papers