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NASCIO Releases Part II of Electronic Records Management and Digital Preservation



July 17, 2007 By

The National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO), which represents the chief information officers (CIOs) of the states, released Part II in its series on electronic records management and digital preservation.

The series presents current issues, challenges and recommendations for action. Part II in this series focuses on economic, legal, and organizational issues and recommended actions for State CIOs related to electronic records management and the preservation of digital content.

Electronic records management and digital preservation are necessary disciplines for managing the knowledge assets of the enterprise. Attention to these disciplines must be part of every IT investment decision. The lifecycle of "born digital" is presented with emphasis on the decision-making process at each major phase.

"Managing electronic records is really the management of knowledge assets," said Dr. Jim Bryant, CIO, state of South Carolina. "This essential resource must receive the proper level of attention in investment and project management decisions. Without proper planning and the necessary partnering with experts from legal, records management, archiving and enterprise architecture, this asset can expose the enterprise to undue risk -- not only in potential litigation risk, but also the risk of losing valuable enterprise knowledge." 

"We're very serious about developing the necessary attention to electronic records management and digital preservation issues," said Steve Fletcher, CIO, state of Utah. "We are publishing this series of research reports in order to advise the state CIOs regarding the issues and calls to action."

Part III in the series will focus on technology issues for managing digital assets, including emerging solutions and the relationship to Enterprise Architecture.


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