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New Wireless Adapter Expands WiFi Range by 3x



September 7, 2006 By

hField Technologies' new high-gain WiFi adapter will dramatically decrease deadspots, multiplying the effectiveness of wireless networks. The company's newly-launched product, Wi-Fire, allows users to connect to a WiFi network from up to 1,000 feet, more than three times the range of standard adapters, at significantly higher speeds, and even in locations where no wireless signal could be detected previously.

Wi-Fire, a fully integrated external Wi-Fi adapter, provides interoperability with any 802.11 b/g system. Patents are pending on the device and its proprietary technology. According to Curtis MacDonald, hField's CTO, "Wi-Fire combines a highly sensitive receiver, a highly-tuned and optimized directional antenna, and unique 'fast-response' connection management software to achieve its extraordinary performance levels." Even in situations where an internal adapter cannot maintain connection with a weak WiFi signal, or even detect it, the Wi-Fire connects at speeds suitable for high bandwidth users.

Wi-Fire, only 3" by 4" with a sleek 3/8" thickness, is small, easy-to-use, and folds up with its mounting device and USB cable for portability. Wi-Fire is currently available for Windows XP only. Other versions are being developed. "Our direct sales efforts target campus and municipal applications," says Tom DiClemente, hField's CEO and Partner of hField investor Gran Sasso Ventures LP. "But, as can be expected, we are also experiencing a high level of interest from home and business users." Blake Kleintop, hField COO, adds, "Our beta tests focused mostly on campus WiFi users. We found that the 'seriously mobile user' in particular always experienced much better performance with the Wi-Fire."

More information on Wi-Fire is available at www.hfield.com.


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