Government Technology

    Digital Communities
    Industry Members

  • Click sponsor logos for whitepapers, case studies, and best practices.
  • McAfee

Public Library to Install RFID Security System



October 10, 2008 By

To reduce its loss factor, the Cynthiana-Harrison Public Library in Kentucky will deploy a radio frequency identification (RFID) security system from 3M Library Systems this fall.

3M will install two single-corridor detection units that use RFID technology to help ensure that circulation items have been properly checked out. Each item will be affixed with an RFID tag, which stores the item's identity and transaction experience, and communicates information using radio waves. An item that has not been checked out will trigger a signal.

Tagging of some 50,000 circulation items has begun, and installation is expected to be completed by the end of November.

Cynthiana Library Director Pat Barnes says the RFID tags may eventually serve more than one purpose, enabling the library to automate such circulation management functions as checkout and return, sorting and inventory.

"Our immediate need was to improve security with respect to items lost," says Barnes. "However, we know that RFID also is used to enhance productivity in libraries, and we are examining that for the near term." A 3M SelfCheck System, which lets customers take out books and audio-visual items without a librarian's assistance, may be next on the library's RFID agenda, she adds.

Rory Yanchek, 3M general manager, says loss prevention is an increasingly critical concern for public libraries as budgets come under growing pressure in the face of expanding demand for services. "Libraries are recognizing that RFID helps make their circulating collections more secure, while also enabling greater productivity in serving the public, with tools such as SelfCheck Systems."

Libraries using RFID technology are especially focused on the durability and reliability of the tags, adds Jacob Haas, marketing manager for 3M. "3M RFID tags are designed to satisfy today's demanding library applications, and 3M warranties that they will last as long as the items to which they are affixed," says Hass.

-cmm

 


| More

Comments

Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Digital Cities & Counties Survey: Best Practices Quick Reference Guide
This Best Practices Quick Reference Guide is a compilation of examples from the 2013 Digital Cities and Counties Surveys showcasing the innovative ways local governments are using technological tools to respond to the needs of their communities. It is our hope that by calling attention to just a few examples from cities and counties of all sizes, we will encourage further collaboration and spark additional creativity in local government service delivery.
Wireless Reporting Takes Pain (& Wait) out of Voting
In Michigan and Minnesota counties, wireless voting via the AT&T network has brought speed, efficiency and accuracy to elections - another illustration of how mobility and machine-to-machine (M2M) technology help governments to bring superior services and communication to constituents.
Why Would a City Proclaim Their Data “Open by Default?”
The City of Palo Alto, California, a 2013 Center for Digital Government Digital City Survey winner, has officially proclaimed “open” to be the default setting for all city data. Are they courageous or crazy?
View All