Government Technology

Top U.S. Digital Cities Announced



November 13, 2007 By

The Center for Digital Government today released results of the seventh annual 2007 Digital Cities Survey which examines how cities use technology to create a seamless environment between local government and constituents. Top-ranked cities in their respective population categories are: Aurora, Colo., Lincoln, Neb., Santa Monica, Calif., Jupiter, Fla. and  Lynchburg, Va.

"This year's winners have really raised the bar for cities," said Cathilea Robinett, executive director for the Center for Digital Government. "Digital technology connects citizens with their government on a level never before achieved."

The survey is open to all U.S. cities with a population of 30,000 or more and respondent cities are classified into four population-based categories. In the major metro category, Aurora, Colo., received the top spot after consistently placing in the top five the past three years. Lincoln, Neb., is first in the 125,000 to 249,999 division and has graced the top 10 six out of seven years.

Out of the mid-level cities -- population of 75,000 to 124,999 -- Santa Monica, Calif., placed first with Roanoke, Va., and Orem, Utah, also in the top three. In the smallest city category, 30,000 to 74,999, there was a tie for first between Jupiter, Fla., and Lynchburg, Va., both returning from last year's top 10.

Winners will be honored at a special awards ceremony in New Orleans on November 15.
Survey sponsors were Hyland Software, Fujitsu and GTSI.


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Comments

Anonymous    |    Commented November 16, 2007

It's interesting how the awards present to the IT people who provide the mechanism but leave out those who provide the business processes, content, and elbow grease required to convert from a paper-based operation to a digital format.

Anonymous    |    Commented November 16, 2007

It's interesting how the awards present to the IT people who provide the mechanism but leave out those who provide the business processes, content, and elbow grease required to convert from a paper-based operation to a digital format.

Anonymous    |    Commented November 16, 2007

It's interesting how the awards present to the IT people who provide the mechanism but leave out those who provide the business processes, content, and elbow grease required to convert from a paper-based operation to a digital format.


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