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Upgrades to Storm Data Application Successful Post-Sandy



December 5, 2012 By

Like many cities along the eastern seaboard, Norfolk, Va., experienced flood waters triggered by Hurricane Sandy in October. But unlike years past, where it could take days to calculate storm damage, a new Web-based application helped the city keep a close eye on Sandy’s impact in real-time, making incident reporting more efficient.

Called STORM -- System to Track, Organize, Record and Map -- the program was launched in 2011, and upgraded earlier this year to incorporate the city’s Department of Public Works’ damage assessment database, cutting down the time the department spends compiling an assessment report from three days to less than 24 hours.

That’s good news for local governments as the number of large, damage-inducing storms has steadily increased in recent years, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and other research groups, making accurate damage assessments even more crucial to wide-scale recovery efforts.

The Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM) requires cities to file the report within three days following a storm. The internal report is used to help the state compile data to apply for federal assistance through the Federal Emergency Management  Agency (FEMA). The problem for Norfolk was that the process could go right down to the wire as inspectors and office staff put together the reports manually.


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