Government Technology

Washington Talking Book and Braille Library Joins Secretary of State's Office



June 22, 2008 By

A Seattle-based library that offers services to thousands of blind and visually impaired individuals is joining state government as a division of the Secretary of State.

"For many years, the Washington Talking Book and Braille Library has provided many valuable and very useful services to our state's blind community," said Secretary of State Sam Reed. "It's a one-of-a-kind resource in Washington, so I'm pleased that WTBBL is joining our State Library. WTBBL customers can be assured that they will continue to receive the same outstanding service."

After planning this transition for the past five years, the Washington Talking Book and Braille Library will officially become part of the Washington State Library on July 1. This new relationship will allow the library to offer more complete services to all Washington residents.

The Washington Talking Book and Braille Library is open to Washington State residents and caters especially to individuals who are legally blind, deaf-blind, visually impaired, physically disabled or learning disabled. Its services include talking books, Braille books and large-print materials, taping services, the Evergreen Radio Reading Service and summer reading programs.

"WTBBL is the only statewide source of books and other materials for individuals who are blind or visually impaired," said Denise Colley, president of the Washington Council of the Blind. "We have no other place to acquire such materials."

In 2003, the Seattle Public Library began working to transfer this service to the Washington State Library to better serve the residents of Washington State.

"I am delighted that this important statewide service, the Washington Talking Book and Braille Library, will be an integral service and program of the Washington State Library," said State Librarian Jan Walsh. "WTBBL is the window to the world for so many of its patrons, and I am pleased that after a five-year transition, it will not only survive but thrive within the Washington State Library."

The Washington Talking Book and Braille Library has around 400 volunteers. Along with volunteers, there are about 9,000 active patrons, 60 percent of whom are over the age of 65.

Reed will welcome the Washington Talking Book and Braille Library to the Office of Secretary of State at an open house in Seattle on July 3. The event will be held at WTBBL, located at 2021 9th Ave. The open house begins at noon and will include refreshments.


| More

Comments

Add Your Comment

You are solely responsible for the content of your comments. We reserve the right to remove comments that are considered profane, vulgar, obscene, factually inaccurate, off-topic, or considered a personal attack.

In Our Library

White Papers | Exclusives Reports | Webinar Archives | Best Practices and Case Studies
Maintain Your IT Budget with Consistent Compliance Practices
Between the demands of meeting federal IT compliance mandates, increasing cybersecurity threats, and ever-shrinking budgets, it’s not uncommon for routine maintenance tasks to slip among state and local government IT departments. If it’s been months, or even only days, since you have maintained your systems, your agency may not be prepared for a compliance audit—and that could have severe financial consequences. Regardless of your mission, consistent systems keep your data secure, your age
Best Practice Guide for Cloud and As-A-Service Procurements
While technology service options for government continue to evolve, procurement processes and policies have remained firmly rooted in practices that are no longer effective. This guide, built upon the collaborative work of state and local government and industry executives, outlines and explains the changes needed for more flexible and agile procurement processes.
Fresh Ideas In Online Security for Public Safety Organizations
Lesley Carhart, Senior Information Security Specialist at Motorola Solutions, knows that online and computer security are more challenging than ever. Personal smartphones, removable devices like USB storage drives, and social media have a significant impact on security. In “Fresh Ideas in Online Security for Public Safely Organizations,” Lesley provides recommendations to improve your online security against threats from social networks, removable devices, weak passwords and digital photos.
View All

Featured Papers